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ferromagnetism

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Image
Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 6.5 (a) Ferromagnetic alignment of atomic magnetic moments. (b) Magnetization vs. temperature showing saturation magnetization, M s . (c) Saturation magnetization vs. temperature below the Curie temperature, T C (d) Susceptibility and reciprocal susceptibility vs. temperature above More
Image
Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 6.7 Demagnetization curve for a permanent ferromagnet showing the ( BH ) max “figure of merit.” The construction determining ( BH ) max is approximate. More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 6.20 Several commonly observed types of hysteresis loops for ferromagnetic and ferrimagnetic materials. More
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Published: 01 June 1988
Fig. 7.12 Representative magnetization curves for a ferromagnetic material. From R. C. McMaster, et al., Metals Handbook , 8th Ed., Vol 11, ASM, Metals Park, OH, 1976, p 93 ( Ref 12 ) More
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Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 17.12 Closed-loop domain structure in ferromagnetic metal More
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Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 17.15 Process of magnetization for a ferromagnetic material. Source: Ref 5 More
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ems.t53730051
EISBN: 978-1-62708-283-9
... Abstract This chapter is a review of magnetic materials and how they behave. It begins by discussing the significance of ferromagnetism and comparing the Curie temperature of several ferromagnetic elements. It then discusses the concept of magnetic domains and illustrates how flux paths...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 1983
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.mlt.t62860203
EISBN: 978-1-62708-348-5
... Linear κ = C / T Small to moderate None Ionic crystals Linear κ = C /( T – θ ) Moderate None Ferromagnets & antiferromagnets above critical temperature Ferromagnetism Saturates Increases to saturation with decreasing T Variable with H ; large Large (hard) Permanent...
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 6.18 Magnetoresistance of polycrystalline cobalt ( Bates, 1946 ). The behavior is typical of the ferromagnetic pure metals and some alloys. More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 34 Reference depth of skin effect as a function of power density and selected generator frequency for ferromagnetic steel. Source: Ref 2 , 20 More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 6.6 Behavior of the magnetization (a) and the flux density (b) for typical hysteretic ferromagnetic materials. The dashed line is the Initial magnetization curve for virgin material. More
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Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 12 Spin-resolved electronic band structure for Ni and Fe, two typical ferromagnetic transition metals. Dotted line represents Fermi energy level. More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 6.15 External ac susceptibility vs. temperature for a spin glass with a ferromagnetic-like intervening state. The real ( κ ′) and imaginary ( κ ″) components of susceptibility are shown. More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 6.25 The low-temperature susceptibility of dilute Cu—Fe alloys ( Fickett, 1974 ). The slope increase at 93 ppm is assumed to be due to the beginnings of a ferromagnetic interaction. More
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Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 11 (a) Resistance change of the MR sensor as a function of angle between the magnetization of the ferromagnetic layers. (b) Resistance change of a linearized sensor as a function of applied magnetic field. More
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Published: 01 August 2015
Fig. 2.3 Effect of hysteresis on heating rate. N: north; S: south; B: flux density in a ferromagnetic material; H: corresponding magnetic intensity. Source: Ref 5 More
Image
Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 2.15 The spontaneous magnetization (white arrows) and the domain structure of ferromagnetic materials. If a droplet of colloid liquid with magnetic particles is put on the surface of a sample whose strain layers have been removed by electrolytic polishing, etc., then the particles More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.emea.t52240303
EISBN: 978-1-62708-251-8
... and are said to be ferromagnetic. As shown in Fig. 17.5 , a bar magnet has two magnetic poles in which magnet field lines leave one pole and enter the other. In fact, every magnet has two magnetic poles that are separated by a definite distance, a characteristic that extends down to even the small magnetic...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.tm.t52320013
EISBN: 978-1-62708-357-7
... basic concepts of thermodynamics of magnetic transition and goes on to discuss the role and the meaning of magnetic transition in iron and steel. 2.4.1 Magnetic Domain Structure of Ferromagnetic Materials <xref ref-type="bibr" rid="t52320013-ref7">(Ref 7)</xref> P. Weiss (1907) presented...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1995
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.sch6.t68200404
EISBN: 978-1-62708-354-6
... to be ferromagnetic, their magnetic permeability ranging from 400 to 1100. Room-temperature values for magnetic permeability of cast stainless steels are given in Table 27-22 . Magnetic Permeability of Thick and Thin Sections of CF-8 Castings Correlated with Ferrite Content...