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fatigue limit

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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 9 Relationship between fatigue limit and tensile strength in polished and in severely notched steel specimens. Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 01 December 1999
Fig. 4 Effect of core strength and case depth on the rolling-contact fatigue limit of gear steels. Tests involved two 4 in. disks driven by a 2 in. roller. Test piece may have been either one of the disks or the roller. Relative radius of curvature, 2/3. SH units = lb/in. of face width divided More
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Published: 01 December 1999
Fig. 6.15 Relationship between fatigue limit and surface residual stress for the Cr-Mn-Ti steel referred to in Fig. 6.14 . Generally (a) A reduction in surface compressive stresses leads to (b) A reduction in bending fatigue resistance. Source: Ref 13 , 15 More
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Published: 01 December 1999
Fig. 7.18 Influence of tempering temperature on the rolling-conact fatigue limit of a carburized and hardened alloy steel. More
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Published: 01 December 1999
Fig. 8.25 Relationship between fatigue limit at 10 7 cycles and contact stress for case-hardened 20Kh2N4A test pieces (7.5 mm diam, 1.1 to 1.5 mm case depth). Source: Ref 27 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 8 Distributions of fatigue limit, curves 1 and 2; residual stresses, curve 3 (550 °C) and curve 4 (620 °C); extraneous loading, curves 5 and 6, 40HM (4140)-grade steel More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 3.31 Fatigue limit as a function of tensile strength for steels tested in room-temperature air or subjected to water spray. Source: Ref 3.30 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 4.7 Variation of fatigue limit and yield stress for TRIP, DP, and HSLA steels. Source: Ref 4.1 More
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Published: 01 December 2001
Fig. 20 Effect of carbon content and hardness on fatigue limit of through-hardened and tempered 4140, 4053, and 4063 steels More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 17 Effect of carbon content and hardness on fatigue limit of through-hardened and tempered 4140, 4053, and 4063 steels. Source: Ref 8 More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 51 Notched and unnotched fatigue limit of Ti-6Al-4V. 6.35 mm (0.25 in.) specimens cut from as rolled bar, solution treated at indicated temperatures, and cooled at various rates (furnace, air, water quench). Rotating beam fatigue at 8000 rpm. Fatigue limits at 10 7 cycles determined More
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Published: 01 December 1996
Fig. 9-29 The fatigue limit as a function of hardness based on quenched and tempered steels. (From Metals Handbook , 8th edition, Vol 1, p 217, American Society for Metals, Metals Park, Ohio (1961), Ref 28 ) More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 4.5 S - N curve showing fatigue characteristics and endurance limit of a metal displaying a fatigue limit. Source: Adapted from Ref 4.5 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 21.34 Fatigue limits as a function of austenitic grain size for 8719 steel carburized and hardened as marked. Source: Ref 21.57 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 21.35 Fatigue limits as a function of retained austenite in 8719 steel carburized and hardened as marked. Source: Ref 21.57 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 21.36 Fatigue limits as a function of austenitic grain size and retained austenite in carburized 8719 steel. Source: Ref 21.57 More
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Published: 01 December 1999
Fig. 4.16 Fatigue limits of plasma and gas-carburized specimens as a function of retained austenite content. More
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Published: 01 December 1999
Fig. 5.14 Fatigue limits of plasma and gas-carburized specimens as a function of austenitic grain size. A, retained austenite. Source: Ref 23 More
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Published: 01 December 1999
Fig. 5.43 Fatigue limits for SiCa-injected and not SiCa-injected steels at different hardness levels. The SiCa-injected steel with D type inclusions has a lower fatigue limit. Source: Ref 65 More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 3.30 Schematic of the general relationship between fatigue limits and tensile strength for steels. Source: Ref 3.30 More