1-20 of 1190 Search Results for

fatigue fracture

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 November 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.uhcf3.t53630117
EISBN: 978-1-62708-270-9
... Abstract Fatigue fractures are generally considered the most serious type of fracture in machinery parts simply because fatigue fractures can and do occur in normal service, without excessive overloads, and under normal operating conditions. This chapter first discusses the three stages...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 September 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.fahtsc.t51130241
EISBN: 978-1-62708-284-6
... Abstract This chapter discusses the various factors influencing the evaluation of fatigue fracture of nitrided layers. It begins by describing the problems of enhancing the fatigue resistance of machine components. The significance and detailed assessment of the effect of a structural flaw...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ffub.t53610209
EISBN: 978-1-62708-303-4
... Abstract This chapter provides information and data on the fatigue and fracture properties of steel, aluminum, and titanium alloys. It explains how microstructure, grain size, inclusions, and other factors affect the fracture toughness and fatigue life of these materials and the extent to which...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ffub.t53610001
EISBN: 978-1-62708-303-4
... Abstract This chapter provides a brief review of industry’s battle with fatigue and fracture and what has been learned about the underlying failure mechanisms and their effect on product lifetime and service. It recounts some of the tragic events that led to the discovery of fatigue and brittle...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ffub.t53610327
EISBN: 978-1-62708-303-4
... Abstract This chapter covers the fatigue and fracture behaviors of ceramics and polymers. It discusses the benefits of transformation toughening, the use of ceramic-matrix composites, fracture mechanisms, and the relationship between fatigue and subcritical crack growth. In regard to polymers...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ffub.t53610377
EISBN: 978-1-62708-303-4
... Abstract Unlike metals, in which fatigue failures are due to a single crack that grows to a critical length, the effects of fatigue in composites are much more distributed and varied. As the chapter explains, there are five major damage mechanisms that contribute to the progression of composite...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 July 1997
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.wip.t65930113
EISBN: 978-1-62708-359-1
... Abstract This article discusses the various options for controlling fatigue and fracture in welded steel structures, the factors that influence them the most, and some of the leading codes and standards for designing against these failure mechanisms. The two most widely used approaches...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ffub.9781627083034
EISBN: 978-1-62708-303-4
Image
Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 23 Surface of a torsional fatigue fracture that caused brittle fracture of the case of an induction-hardened axle of 1541 steel. The fatigue crack originated (arrow) at a fillet (with a radius smaller than specified) at a change in shaft diameter near a keyway runout. Case hardness More
Image
Published: 01 December 2009
Fig. 12.4 Fatigue fracture surface appearance of a failed crankshaft, showing beach marks on the lower part. The origin of the primary fracture is indicated by the arrow. Source: Ref 1 More
Image
Published: 01 February 2005
Fig. 22.11 Fatigue fracture in forward extrusion die [ Lange et al., 1992a ] More
Image
Published: 01 February 2005
Fig. 22.14 Fatigue fracture in backward extrusion of constant velocity joints [ Nagoa et al., 1994 ] More
Image
Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 5 The offsetting effect of rotation on fatigue fracture beach marks reveals the direction of shaft rotation during operations More
Image
Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 13 A classic fatigue-fracture surface showing progression marks (beach marks) that indicate successive positions of the advancing crack front More
Image
Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 15.25 Region where the fatigue fracture of Fig. 15.24 started (right side) and a cross section in the axial-radial plane of the axis of Fig. 15.24 . The macrograph performed on the cut surface (left side) indicate the presence of a weld repair, with the weld-deposited metal More
Image
Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 18.1 The region where the fatigue fracture of the axle presented in Fig. 15.24 (Chapter 15, “Engineered Special Bar Quality Steel (Engineered Steels),” in this book) started. (a) The radial aspect of the marks inside the defect that started the fatigue failure. (b) A view of the region More
Image
Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 16 Fatigue fracture surface. (a) High applied load. (b) Low applied load More
Image
Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 6 Fatigue fracture of a 3¼ in. diam induction-hardened shaft of 1541 steel after fatigue testing in rotary bending. Fatigue fracture origins A and B were subsurface due to the steep induction-hardened gradient and lack of an external stress concentration. (See Fig. 9 in Chapter 3 More
Image
Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 13 Multiple-origin fatigue fracture of a short, stubby ⅝ in. bolt that fractured under tensile fatigue. (a) Numerous fatigue origins separated by radial ratchet marks. (b) Close-up of several fatigue origins separated by ratchet marks. Because this bolt was in a continuously operated test More
Image
Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 14 Schematic, highly enlarged sketch of a typical fatigue-fracture surface. Sketch shows three origins (stage 1) at O; thousands of microscopic, closely spaced fatigue striations (stage 2) at S; a few beach marks, or arrest lines, at B; and two ratchet marks at R where fatigue cracks More