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eutectoid transformation

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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 3.13 Variation of eutectoid transformation temperature with concentrations of various alloying elements in solution. Source: Ref 16 . More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 3.9 Effect of substitutional alloying elements on eutectoid transformation temperature in steel. Source: Ref 3.11 More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 9.13 The interface diffusion model for eutectoid transformation and the relation of v * – λ* – Δ T . (a) Movement of B atoms. (b) Mutual relationship among λ, Δ G , degree of supercooling, and growth rate More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 March 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.pdub.t53420143
EISBN: 978-1-62708-310-2
... Abstract This chapter discusses the characteristics of eutectoid transformations, a type of solid-state transformation associated with invariant reactions, focusing on the iron-carbon system of steel. It describes the compositions, characteristics, and properties of ferrite, eutectoid...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.tm.t52320259
EISBN: 978-1-62708-357-7
... Abstract This chapter provides a classification of the types of microstructural changes and transformations and then reviews each type. It presents the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov (JMAK) equation and explains the thermodynamics of eutectic solidification and eutectoid transformation...
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Published: 01 May 2018
FIG. 10.16 Isothermal transformation diagram for an iron-carbon alloy of eutectoid composition (0.80% C), including austenite to pearlite and austenite to bainite transformations. Source: Atlas of Isothermal Transformation and Cooling Transformation Diagrams , ASM International. More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 2.5 Isothermal transformation of austenite to pearlite in eutectoid carbon steel. Source: Ref 2.1 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 2.6 Isothermal transformation of eutectoid steel from austenite to pearlite ( A - P ) and austenite to bainite ( A - B ). Source: Ref 2.1 More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 9.7 (Part 1) Martensite formation in transformation of eutectoid steels. (a) to (f) 0.8% C (0.81 C-0.07Si-0.65Mn, wt%). (a) Austenitized at 850 °C, quenched to 210 °C, tempered at 300 °C. Picral. 250×. (b) Austenitized at 850 °C, quenched to 210 °C, tempered at 300 °C. Picral More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 3.9 Isothermal transformation diagram for a plain carbon eutectoid steel, snowing the M s and M f isotherms and the C curves. A, 0.01 vol fraction pearlite; B, 0.99 vol fraction pearlite; 0.01 vol fraction upper bainite; D, 0.99 vol fraction upper bainite; E, 0.01 vol fraction lower More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 9.1 (Part 3) (i) Kinetics of the transformation of the eutectoid steel illustrated in Fig. 9.1 (Part 1) (a) to (e) . More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 9.1 (Part 4) (j) Envelope type of isothermal transformation diagram for a eutectoid steel showing the times required for the transformation to start and to finish. More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 7.22 Schematic presentation of the transformation of austenite in pro-eutectoid ferrite and pearlite (P) in conditions close to equilibrium. Steel has hypo-eutectoid composition. Adapted from: Ref 10 More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 7.31 Schematic presentation of the transformation of austenite in pro-eutectoid cementite and pearlite (P) in conditions close to equilibrium. Steel has hyper-eutectoid composition. Adapted from: Ref 10 More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 9.21 Schematic TTT curve for a eutectoid steel. The pearlite transformation curve is essentially superimposed on the bainitic transformation curve. The diagram also illustrates schematically the temperature at which martensite formation starts. A = austenite, F = ferrite, C = carbide. More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 9.33 Fraction transformed curve in an isothermal transformation of an eutectoid steel at 600 °C (1110 °F). The start and the end of the transformation (s and f) are normally characterized by volume fractions that can be measured via quantitative metallography. More
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Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. 6 Time-temperature-transformation (TTT) diagram for a eutectoid (0.77%) carbon steel. Source: Ref 3 More
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Published: 31 December 2020
Fig. 1 Transformation diagram of eutectoid carbon steel. (a) Relationship of continuous cooling diagram to the isothermal diagram; (b) critical cooling rate for 100% martensite is 140 °C per second (250 °F per second) for eutectoid steel. This drawing is adapted from Fig. 1 of Chapter 3 . More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 4.3 Beta transformation in a eutectoid system. Phase relationships can be predicted by extrapolating the beta phase boundaries below the eutectoid temperature. The beta phase transforms into alpha and an intermetallic phase, gamma. More
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Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. A.20 Cooling transformation diagram for a eutectoid carbon steel (0.77% C). Curve B results in the microstructure composed of pearlite and martensite. Curve D corresponds to the rate of cooling during annealing. Curve C corresponds to normalizing. Cooling rates (curves Q 1 , Q 2 More