1-20 of 519 Search Results for

embrittlement

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.spsp2.t54410439
EISBN: 978-1-62708-265-5
... This chapter describes the causes of cracking, embrittlement, and low toughness in carbon and low-alloy steels and their differentiating fracture surface characteristics. It discusses the interrelated effects of composition, processing, and microstructure and contributing factors such as hot...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2007
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.htcma.t52080423
EISBN: 978-1-62708-304-1
... the corrosion behavior of alloys in molten aluminum, zinc, lead, lithium, sodium, magnesium, mercury, cadmium, tin, antimony, and bismuth. It also discusses the problem of liquid metal embrittlement, explaining how it is caused by low-melting-point metals during brazing, welding, and heat treating operations...
Image
Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 24-16 Loss in room-temperature toughness due to temper embrittlement, illustrated for wrought Ni-Cr-Mo steel ( 13 ) More
Image
Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 43 Effect of surface embrittlement from varied ultraviolet (UV) exposure times on creep-rupture behavior of polyethylene at 80 °C (175 °F). Source: Ref 37 More
Image
Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 23 Transgranular and intergranular hydrogen embrittlement fractures. (a) Transgranular cleavage fracture in hydrogen embrittled annealed type 301 austenitic stainless steel; (b) Intergranular decohesion fracture in hydrogen embrittled 4130 steel heat treated to 1275 MPa (185 ksi). Source More
Image
Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 64 Hydrogen embrittlement failure of a 300 M steel space shuttle orbiter nose landing gear steering collar pin. The pin was heat treated to a 1895-MPa (275 ksi) strength level. The part was plated with chromium and titanium-cadmium. (a) Pin showing location of failure (actual size). (b More
Image
Published: 01 December 1984
Figure 3-43 Samples that were subjected to stepwise cooling embrittlement cycle and etched with the special etchants of Cohen et al. (top), Rucker (middle), and with saturated aqueous picric acid (bottom), 275×. More
Image
Published: 01 December 2001
Fig. 27 Influence of alloying elements on the temper embrittlement of steels (compositions given in accompanying table) containing 600 to 800 ppm Sb. The left end of each bar gives the nonembrittled ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT); the right end of the bar gives the DBTT after More
Image
Published: 01 December 2001
Fig. 28 Influence of alloying elements on the temper embrittlement of steels (compositions given in accompanying tables). (a) Steel containing 500 to 600 ppm P. (b) Steel containing 460 to 480 ppm Sn. (c) Steel containing 500 to 530 ppm As. The left end of each bar gives the nonembrittled ductile More
Image
Published: 01 July 2000
Fig. 7.71 Potential ranges of stress-corrosion cracking by (I) hydrogen embrittlement, (II) cracking of unstable passive film, and (III) cracking initiated by pits near the pitting potential. Vertical dashed lines define potential range over which nonpassivating type films may crack under stress. More
Image
Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 10.66 Two types of temper embrittlement, measured by the drop in absorbed energy in impact test. (a) The most common type, observed in many engineering steels (some examples indicated on the curves). (b) Embrittlement observed in some special high alloy steels such as the one presented More
Image
Published: 01 December 2018
Fig. 6.105 Boiler tube showing cracking due to caustic embrittlement More
Image
Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 16 Illustration of toughness loss after tempering in the embrittlement range. Source: Ref 17 More
Image
Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 3.7 Influence of aluminum on embrittlement in the titanium-aluminum system. Aluminum (up to approximately 8%) sharply increases the strength level of titanium, but it lowers ductility. More
Image
Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 4.22 Test results of hydrogen embrittlement cracking of iron-nickel-cobalt steels. Source: Ref 4.31 More
Image
Published: 31 December 2020
Fig. 5 The 475 °C (885 °F) embrittlement effect on hardness of an alloy held 500 hours at temperatures shown More
Image
Published: 01 December 1989
Fig. 2.21. Intergranular fracture produced by temper embrittlement in a Ni-Cr-Mo-V steel. (50X; shown here at 80%) More
Image
Published: 01 December 1989
Fig. 2.22. Shift in transition curve due to temper embrittlement in a weld deposit ( Ref 64 ). More
Image
Published: 01 December 1989
Fig. 2.27. Effect of phosphorus content on the temper embrittlement (ΔFATT) of three step-cooled forging steels ( Ref 85 ). More
Image
Published: 01 December 1989
Fig. 2.32. Effects of prior temper embrittlement and yield strength on the K H value of a Ni-Cr-Mo-V steel ( Ref 93 ). A, B, C, and D denote steels with yield strengths of 862, 986, 1090, and 1175 MPa (125, 143, 158, and 170 ksi), respectively. More