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elongation

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Published: 01 April 2013
Fig. 5 Effect of gage length on the percent elongation. (a) Elongation, %, as a function of gage length for a fractured tension test piece. (b) Distribution of elongation along a fractured tension test piece. Original spacing between gage marks, 12.5 mm (0.5 in.). Source: Ref 3 More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 2.3 Effect of gage length on percent elongation. (a) Percent elongation as a function of gage length for a fractured tension testpiece. (b) Distribution of elongation along a fractured tension testpiece. Original spacing between gage marks, 12.5 mm (0.5 in.) Source: Ref 2.1 More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 7.24 Elongation to fracture for zone-purified iron (elongation only is shown), 9-nickel steel, and carbon steel plotted against temperature ( Smith and Rutherford, 1957 ; Tobler, 1976a ; Warren and Reed, 1963 ). More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 14 Effect of gage length on the percent elongation. (a) Elongation, %, as a function of gage length for a fractured tensile test piece. (b) Distribution of elongation along a fractured tension test piece. Original spacing between gage marks, 12.5 mm (0.5 in.). Source: Ref 7 More
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Published: 30 April 2020
Fig. 10.17 Sintered strength (upper curve) and elongation (lower curve) of 10 μm water-atomized 17-4 PH stainless steel powder after sintering 60 min in hydrogen at temperatures from 900 to 1350 °C (1650 to 2460 °F) More
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Published: 01 April 2013
Fig. 14 Test specimen with an extensometer attached to measure specimen elongation. Courtesy of Epsilon Technology Corporation. Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 9 Variation of local elongation along gage length. Source: Ref 5 More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 12 Measurement of bolt elongation in a typical test joint. Source: Ref 2 More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 9 Comparison of true and total elongation. Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 01 July 2009
Fig. 14.3 Tensile strength (UTS), yield strength, and elongation as a function of temperature for extruded Lockalloy LX62. Source: London 1979 More
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Published: 01 July 2009
Fig. 17.1 Modulus and elongation properties for hot-pressed block, grade S-200F. Source: Brush Wellman 2001 More
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Published: 01 July 2009
Fig. 17.7 Elongation as a function of temperature for smooth bar specimens from vacuum hot-pressed blocks of S-65B (solid line) and S-200E (broken line) beryllium. Included are results of a competing graphite product. Source: Smith et al. 1985 More
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Published: 01 July 2009
Fig. 17.11 Elongation of hot-pressed blocks as a function of temperature comparing grade S-200F (broken line) with grade S-200E (dot-dash line) beryllium in longitudinal direction. Elongation of grade S-200F transverse (solid line) also given. Source: Haws 1985 More
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Published: 01 July 2009
Fig. 17.14 Temperature dependence of total elongation of HP21 beryllium. Source: Borch 1979 More
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Published: 01 July 2009
Fig. 17.24 Temperature and strain-rate dependence of total elongation of hot-pressed HY beryllium. Source: Borch 1979 More
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Published: 01 July 2009
Fig. 17.60 Effect of grain size on the temperature dependency of elongation of beryllium with different maximum grain sizes: curve 1, 300 μm; curve 2, 170 μm; curve 3, 112 μm; curve 4, 80 μm; curve 5, 1.5 μm. Source: Volokita and Tikhinskii 1989 More
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Published: 01 July 2009
Fig. 17.63 Transverse tensile elongation at 556 °C (1033 °F) as a function of free-aluminum content. Source: Stonehouse 1979 More
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Published: 01 July 2009
Fig. 19.15 Frequency distribution of percent elongation for 241 forged beryllium powder parts. Source: Orrell 1963a , b More
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Published: 01 July 2009
Fig. 20.22 Effect of extrusion-reduction ratio (12.4:1, 28:1, 38:1) on elongation as a function of temperature for vacuum hot pressed (QMV) beryllium hot extruded between 1050 and 1100 °C (1920 and 2010 °F). Source: Beaver and Wikle 1954 More
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Published: 01 October 2012
Fig. 6.10 Ranges of yield strength and tensile elongation as functions of test temperature for γ-TiAl alloys. BDT, brittle-ductile transition. Source: Ref 6.1 More