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electron beam welding

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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 13 Redesign of a bevel pinion using electron beam welding that was impossible to heat treat in one piece. Source: Ref 11 More
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Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 4.10 Primary components of an electron beam welding unit. Source: Ref 4.6 More
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Published: 01 October 2012
Fig. 5.40 Low-voltage electron beam welding unit consisting of a 3505 × 2845 × 2690 mm (138 × 112 × 106 in.) chamber. Courtesy of Sciaky Bros., Inc. Source: Ref 5.18 More
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Published: 01 July 2009
Fig. 14.6 Electron beam welding of a 1.25 cm thick section of AlBeMet 162 showing the base metal on the right More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 11.28 (Part 3) (g) Shape of the weld pool formed in an electron-beam weld. Metal flows down the front of the weld pool and then in the direction of the arrows after the weld pool has passed. After Ref 20 . More
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Published: 01 June 2016
Fig. 11.10 (a) Crack in electron-beam-welded aluminum alloy Al-6061 (right: weld metal; left: parent metal). (b) Crack-free electron beam weld in Al-6082 alloy made with cold-sprayed buttering layer using Al-4041 alloy. Source: Ref 11.15 . Courtesy of TWI Ltd. More
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Published: 01 July 1997
Fig. 15 Micrograph of transverse section of an electron-beam welded butt weld joining 2.5 mm (0.100 in.) thick Ti-6Al-4V sheet using a 0.127 mm (0.005 in.) thick tantalum shim placed in the joint. Kroll’s reagent was used as etchant. More
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Published: 01 July 1997
Fig. 8 Electron-beam welds showing flaws that can occur in poor welds and the absence of flaws in a good weld with reinforcement More
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Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 1.7 25Cr-1Mo steel plate, single-pass electron beam weld. Macrostructure shows high depth-to-width ratio of the fusion zone, which is typical of high-energy-density welding processes. Source: Ref 1.3 More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.jub.t53290079
EISBN: 978-1-62708-306-5
... Abstract This chapter discusses the fusion welding processes, namely oxyfuel gas welding, oxyacetylene braze welding, stud welding (stud arc welding and capacitor discharge stud welding), high-frequency welding, electron beam welding, laser beam welding, hybrid laser arc welding, and thermit...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 July 1997
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.wip.t65930311
EISBN: 978-1-62708-359-1
... Abstract This article discusses the fusion welding processes that are most widely used for joining titanium, namely, gas-tungsten arc welding, gas-metal arc welding, plasma arc welding, laser-beam welding, and electron-beam welding. It describes several important and interrelated aspects...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 July 1997
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.wip.t65930197
EISBN: 978-1-62708-359-1
... of service failures. The discussion covers various factors that may lead to the failure of arc welds, electroslag welds, electrogas welds, resistance welds, flash welds, upset butt welds, friction welds, electron beam welds, and laser beam welds. corrosion deformation fracture inspection mechanical...
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 11.28 (Part 4) (h) Progression of the weld pool during butt welding with a high-energy beam. Applies specifically to welding with a laser beam, but applies equally to electron-beam welding. More
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Published: 01 December 2000
Fig. 12.32 Effect of welding processes on fatigue crack growth rate of longitudinally oriented titanium alloys. (a) Ti-6Al-4V alpha-beta alloy. (b) Ti-15V-3Cr-3Al-3Sn beta alloy. GTAW, gas-tungsten arc welding; EBW, electron beam welding; LBW, laser beam welding More
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Published: 01 December 2000
Fig. 9.3 Macrograph showing coarse prior-beta grain size in weld metal of an electron beam-welded Ti-6Al-4V forging More
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Published: 01 July 1997
Fig. 4 Epitaxial and columnar growth near fusion line in iridium alloy electron beam weld. Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 11.28 (Part 1) Electron-beam square butt weld. 0.55% C (0.57C-0.25Si-0.73Mn, wt%. CE = 0.69) normalized. (a) Weld region. Picric acid-zephiran chloride. 5×. (b) Heat-affected zone. 2% nital. 250×. (c) Parent metal immediately adjacent to heat-affected zone. 230 HV. Picral. 500×. (d More
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Published: 01 July 1997
Fig. 7 A burst in an electron beam butt weld More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2000
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ttg2.t61120065
EISBN: 978-1-62708-269-3
... weld of alpha-beta alloy Ti-6Al-4V. (a) 10×. (b) 240× Fig. 9.2 Macrograph showing columnar beta grains in a Ti-6Al-4V laser beam weld. 13× Fig. 9.3 Macrograph showing coarse prior-beta grain size in weld metal of an electron beam-welded Ti-6Al-4V forging Fig. 9.4...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 1999
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.lmcs.t66560309
EISBN: 978-1-62708-291-4
..., including electroslag, TIG, gas, electron-beam, and arc welding as well as vacuum diffusion, forge, friction, electrical-resistance, and explosive welding. It also discusses the effect of welding temperature, pressure, and composition on the transformations that occur in and around the weld, and it includes...