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electron beam

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Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 12 Electron beam charging dependence on beam energy. More
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Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 2 The pictorial representation of Auger electron process and electron beam interaction with solid specimen. More
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Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 12 SEM image (left) and Electron Beam Signal Image Mapping (ESIM) (right). The white area in ESIM image shows the location where the device toggles at the specified frequency. The green circles indicate the toggling device locations in both images. More
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Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 7 Electron beam – sample interaction volume and interaction products. More
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Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 5 Electron beam – sample interaction volume and interaction products. More
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Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 8(a) O K-α elemental map. Electron beam energy is 5 keV, magnification is 10,000x. More
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Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 8(b) Si K-α elemental map. Electron beam energy is 5 keV, magnification is 10,000x. More
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Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 8(c) Al K-α elemental map. Electron beam energy is 5 keV, magnification is 10,000x. More
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Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 11(a) O K-α elemental map. Electron beam energy is 15 keV, magnification is 10,000x. More
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Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 11(b) Si K-α elemental map. Electron beam energy is 15 keV, magnification is 10,000x. More
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Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 11(c) Al K-α elemental map. Electron beam energy is 15 keV, magnification is 10,000x. More
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Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 8 A single crystal diffraction pattern recorded with electron beam oriented parallel to the [110] direction in silicon. Selected diffraction spots from various crystallographic planes have been indexed. More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 6.1 Summary of main interactions as an electron beam reaches a sample. Many results of these interactions can be used to acquire useful information about the sample. More
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Published: 01 December 2018
Fig. 5.11 Interaction of primary electron beam with the sample. Source: Ref 5.10 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 22.14 Schematic diagram of the effects of laser- and electron beam heating, melting, and solidification. Source: Ref 22.53 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 13 Redesign of a bevel pinion using electron beam welding that was impossible to heat treat in one piece. Source: Ref 11 More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 11.28 (Part 1) Electron-beam square butt weld. 0.55% C (0.57C-0.25Si-0.73Mn, wt%. CE = 0.69) normalized. (a) Weld region. Picric acid-zephiran chloride. 5×. (b) Heat-affected zone. 2% nital. 250×. (c) Parent metal immediately adjacent to heat-affected zone. 230 HV. Picral. 500×. (d More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 11.28 (Part 3) (g) Shape of the weld pool formed in an electron-beam weld. Metal flows down the front of the weld pool and then in the direction of the arrows after the weld pool has passed. After Ref 20 . More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 3 Energy distribution of signals generated by the electron beam More
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Published: 01 June 2016
Fig. 11.10 (a) Crack in electron-beam-welded aluminum alloy Al-6061 (right: weld metal; left: parent metal). (b) Crack-free electron beam weld in Al-6082 alloy made with cold-sprayed buttering layer using Al-4041 alloy. Source: Ref 11.15 . Courtesy of TWI Ltd. More