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eddy current

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Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 April 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.imub.t53720183
EISBN: 978-1-62708-305-8
... Abstract Liquid penetrant, magnetic particle, and eddy current inspection are used to detect surface flaws. This chapter is a detailed account of the physical principles, process description, equipment requirements, selection criteria, advantages, limitations, and applications of these surface...
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 7.28 Effect of a crack on the pattern of eddy-current flow in a pipe More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 5.4 Apparatus for the eddy current decay technique. A recorder is used to display long time-constant traces (large specimens of very pure metals) and an oscilloscope for shorter time constants. More
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Published: 01 April 2013
Fig. 10 Two common types of inspection coils and the patterns of eddy current flow generated by the exciting current in the coils. Solenoid type coil is applied to cylindrical or tubular parts; pancake type coil, to a flat surface. Source: Ref 11 More
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Published: 01 April 2013
Fig. 15 Two common types of inspection coils and the patterns of eddy current flow generated by the exciting current in the coils. (a) Solenoid type coil is applied to cylindrical or tubular parts. (b) Pancake type coil applied to a flat surface. Source: Ref 3 More
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Published: 01 April 2013
Fig. 16 Effect of a crack on the pattern of eddy current flow in a pipe. Source: Ref 3 More
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Published: 01 April 2013
Fig. 17 Principal elements of a typical system for eddy current inspection of bar or tubing. See description in text. Source: Ref 3 More
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Published: 01 April 2013
Fig. 21 Variation in density of eddy current as a function of depth below the surface of a conductor, known as skin effect. Source: Ref 3 More
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Published: 01 April 2013
Fig. 23 Types and applications of coils used in eddy current inspection. (a) Probe type coil applied to a flat plate for crack detection. (b) Horseshoe shape, or U-shape, coil applied to a flat plate for laminar flaw detection. (c) Encircling coil applied to a tube. (d) Internal, or bobbin More
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Published: 01 April 2013
Fig. 24 Multiple coils used in eddy current inspection. (a) Absolute coil arrangement. (b) Differential coil arrangement. Source: Ref 3 More
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Published: 01 April 2013
Fig. 25 Four types of eddy current instruments. (a) A simple arrangement, in which voltage across the coil is monitored. (b) Typical impedance bridge. (c) Impedance bridge with dual coils. (d) Impedance bridge with dual coils and a reference sample in the second coil. Source: Ref 3 More
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Published: 01 April 2013
Fig. 8 Coil assembly for the inspection of steel bars by the eddy current system. Dimensions in inches. Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 01 April 2013
Fig. 9 Schematic of a rotating probe type eddy current flaw detector. Source: Ref 2 More
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Published: 01 April 2013
Fig. 10 Plot of eddy current signal output versus flaw depth to gage detectability of flaws in cold drawn bars. Source: Ref 2 More
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Published: 01 April 2013
Fig. 11 Eddy current flaw detection method for cold-drawn hexagonal bars. (a) Location of artificial flaws ranging from 0.5 to 19 mm (0.020 to ¾ in.) below probe position. (b) Schematic of setup for standard voltage comparison (encircling coil) method (left) and plot of signals obtained More
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Published: 01 April 2013
Fig. 12 Plot of eddy current signal output versus flaw depth to measure detectability of flaw, specifically material flaws (open circles) and process induced cracks (closed circles), in cold drawn hexagonal bars. Source: Ref 2 More
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Published: 01 April 2013
Fig. 13 Plot of eddy current signal output versus flaw depth to measure detectability of flaws, specifically cracks (open circles) and scabs (closed circles), in cold drawn wires. Source: Ref 2 More
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Published: 01 April 2013
Fig. 15 Schematic of eddy current flaw detection system used to inspect sheared bolt illustrated in Fig. 14 . Source: Ref 2 More
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Published: 01 April 2013
Fig. 16 Operation of rotating eddy current detection head. (a) Shear bolt positioned under rotating detection head. (b) Rotating detection head descends to lower probes into position to inspect bolt head. (c) Probe scans bolt head as bolt undergoes two complete revolutions to detect flaws More
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Published: 01 April 2013
Fig. 17 Plot of eddy current signal output versus flaw depth to measure detectability of flaws in high tensile sheared bolts. Source: Ref 2 More