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ductility

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Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 November 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.uhcf3.t53630101
EISBN: 978-1-62708-270-9
... Abstract Ductile fracture results from the application of an excessive stress to a metal that has the ability to deform permanently, or plastically, prior to fracture. Careful examination and knowledge of the metal, its thermal history, and its hardness are important in determining the correct...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.aub.t61170062
EISBN: 978-1-62708-297-6
... Abstract This article discusses the metallurgy and properties of ductile cast iron. It begins with an overview of ductile or spheroidal-graphite iron, describing the specifications, applications, and compositions. It then discusses the importance of composition control and explains how various...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ffub.t53610055
EISBN: 978-1-62708-303-4
... Abstract This chapter discusses the causes and effects of ductile and brittle fracture and their key differences. It describes the characteristics of ductile fracture, explaining how microvoids develop and coalesce into larger cavities that are rapidly pulled apart, leaving bowl-shaped voids...
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 6.2 Effects of cold work on the hardness, tensile strength, and ductility of copper and iron. Here cold work means the percent reduction of thickness by rolling. Source: Ref 6.1 More
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Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 28.2 Effects of interstitial content on strength and ductility of titanium. Source: Ref 3 More
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Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 28.3 Effect of hydrogen content (ppm) on ductility of alpha titanium. Source: Ref 3 More
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Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. 10 Strength and ductility ranges of as-cast and heat treated ductile irons. Source: Ref 8 , 9 More
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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 12.8 Effects of internal hydrogen content and strain rate on tensile ductility of U-0.75Ti tested in dry air. Source: Ref 12.35 More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 5.14 (Part 1) Through-thickness ductility of lamellar tearing in rolled plate. (a) Lamellar tear adjacent to a highly restrained fillet weld. Nitric-acetic acid. 1×. (b) Lamellar tear along a central segregate containing numerous elongated manganese sulfide inclusions. Unetched. 100 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 18.10 The effect of strain rate on ductility (top), strain hardening (middle), and tensile and yield strengths (bottom) of an 0.14% C steel with martensitic microstructure tested at 150 °C (300 °F). Source: Ref 18.10 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 18.16 Ductility properties as a function of carbon content of 41xx and 43xx steels quenched to martensite and tempered at 150 °C (300 °F) for 1 h More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 19.4 Schematic diagram of ductility troughs that might develop during hot work. Source: Ref 19.13 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 19.5 Hot ductility curves showing changes of reduction of area (R of A) as a function of test temperature for steels containing various combinations of V and N. Source: Ref 19.14 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 19.6 Hot ductility curves showing changes in reduction of area (R of A) as a function of test temperature for steels containing various amounts of Nb and Nb and V. Source: Ref 19.14 More
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Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 15.7 Stress-rupture curves with high and low rupture ductility. Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 18.20 Effect of hydrogen on ductility of steels grouped by ultimate tensile strength (UTS) More
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Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 19.13 Hardness and ductility as a function of carbon content. Source: Ref 9 More
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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 1.4 Comparison of (a) slow-strain-rate data plotted as a ductility ratio to (b) the same data plotted as an environment-dependent property vs. the environment-independent value of the same property. Source: Ref 1.13 More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 14.27 Effect of solution treatment on ductility and creep rupture of alloy Ti8Al-1Mo-1V More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 17.7 Yield strength and formability (in terms of tensile ductility) of conventional high-strength steels (HSS) and advanced high-strength steels (AHSS). See text for description of steel types. More