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ductile iron

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Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.isceg.t59320163
EISBN: 978-1-62708-332-4
... Abstract Ductile iron has far superior mechanical properties compared to gray iron as well as significantly improved castability and attractive cost savings compared to cast steel. This chapter begins with information on graphite morphology and matrix type. It then discusses the advantages...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.isceg.t59320195
EISBN: 978-1-62708-332-4
... of austemperability requirements. Then outlines of austenitizing and austempering cycles and resultant microstructures are presented. This is followed by sections discussing the mechanical properties, advantages, limitations, machinability, process variants, and applications of austempered ductile iron (ADI...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.aub.t61170062
EISBN: 978-1-62708-297-6
... Abstract This article discusses the metallurgy and properties of ductile cast iron. It begins with an overview of ductile or spheroidal-graphite iron, describing the specifications, applications, and compositions. It then discusses the importance of composition control and explains how various...
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Published: 01 January 2022
Fig. 4.12 Comparison of properties of gray iron, malleable iron, ductile iron, and steel. Source: Ref 9 More
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Published: 01 January 2022
Fig. 13.18 Cast iron brake rotor and ductile iron brake caliper assembly More
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Published: 01 January 2022
Fig. 11.5 Thermal conductivity comparison of ductile iron, compacted graphite iron, and gray iron. Source: Ref 2 More
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Published: 01 March 2001
Fig. 3 Erosive wear behavior of as-received and laser-melted gray and ductile irons. Source: Ref 3 More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 17.88 Austempered ductile iron. Bainitic matrix (bainitic ferrite) and retained austenite (white areas). Structure known as ausferrite. Graphite nodules. Etchant: nital. Courtesy of J. Sertucha, Azterlan, Centro de Investigacion Metalurgica, Durango, Bizkaia, Spain. More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 17.89 Austempered ductile iron. Graphite, bainitic ferrite formed during austempering and retained austenite. Structure known as ausferrite. Etchant: nital. Courtesy of W. Guesser, Tupy Fundições, Joinville, SC, Brazil. More
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Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. 8 Influence of austenitizing temperature on hardness of ductile iron. Each value represents the average of three hardness readings. Specimens (13 mm, or ½ in., cubes) were heated in air for 1 h and water quenched. Source: Ref 8 , 9 More
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Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. 9 Influence of tempering temperature on mechanical properties of ductile iron quenched from 870 °C (1600 °F) and tempered 2 h. Data represent irons from four heats with composition ranges of: 3.52 to 3.68% C, 2.28 to 2.35% Si, 0.02 to 0.04% P, 0.22 to 0.41% Mn, 0.69 to 0.99% Ni, and 0.045 More
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Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. 11 Effect of austempering temperature on properties of ductile iron. (a) Yield strength and tensile strength vs. austempering temperature. (b) Impact strength vs. austempering temperature. Source: Ref 8 , 9 More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 3.26 Microstructure of a ductile iron showing graphite nodules (gray) with rims of ferrite (white) in a matrix of pearlite. 4% picral etch. 100× More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 3.27 Microstructure of a graphite nodule in ductile iron showing the internal structure of the nodule radiating from the central nucleus. Polarized light. Unetched. 500× More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 10.14 Typical carbon and silicon ranges for ductile iron castings More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 10.16 As-cast and annealed microstructure of a ductile iron. (a) As-cast pearlitic condition (grade 85-55-06) with graphite nodules in envelopes of ferrite (bull’s-eye structure) in a matrix of pearlite. (b) Same iron but annealed for 6 h at 788 °C (1450 °F) and furnace cooled to a lower More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 10.17 Hardened zone from the surface of a flame-hardened ductile iron. (a) Graphite nodule (black) in a martensitic matrix with some retained austenite (white). (b) Same iron but cast in a thicker section, which resulted in larger graphite nodules More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 10.18 Tensile properties versus hardness of ductile iron More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 10.20 Tensile strength versus elongation of ductile iron with different heat treatments or as-cast conditions. More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 10.22 Microstructure of austempered ductile iron (Fe-3.6C-2.5Si-0.052Mg-0.7Cu). AF, acicular ferrite; A, austenite; M, martensite. The casting was austempered at 900 °C (1650 °F), held 2 h, taken to salt bath at 360 °C (680 °F), held 30 min, and air cooled. (a) Etched with 4% nital. (b More