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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 10.7 Example of titanium forged in open or flat dies as in blacksmithing (hand forging) More
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Published: 01 August 2012
Fig. 1.12 Die geometries and sheared dies used in blanking. Adapted from Ref 1.3 , 1.8 More
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Published: 01 August 2012
Fig. 5.24 Schematic view of a tooling in which dies and punch are heated. Source: Ref 5.18 More
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Published: 01 August 2012
Fig. 8.15 Sheet hydroforming with dies used at the Technical University of Dortmund. (a) Schematic showing elements of the blank holder. (b) Photograph of the vertical blank holder segments, with an example hydroformed rectangular part with overall dimensions of 900 × 460 mm (35 × 18 in.). (c More
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Published: 01 August 2012
Fig. 9.31 Crosswise and lengthwise split dies. Source: Ref 9.22 More
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Published: 01 August 2012
Fig. 9.32 Prototype die (left) and production dies (right). Source: Ref 9.18 , 9.19 More
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Published: 01 August 2012
Fig. 14.12 Conventional clinching dies (left, middle) and flat anvil for dieless clinching (right). Source: Ref 14.5 More
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Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 14 Bottom die #8 in the stack exposed and intact after removal of 7 dies. The 10μm adhesive layer is intact and ready for removal to expose the die surface. More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 2 Examples of hot work dies for (a) press forging and (b) die casting. Courtesy of Villares Metals More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 25 Examples of heat checking cracks on aluminum die-casting dies. Cracks are white because they are filled with aluminum. Courtesy of Villares Metals More
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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 11 Cavitation pitting fatigue. (a) Cavitation pitting on a gray cast iron diesel-engine cylinder sleeve. The pitted area is several inches long, and the pits nearly penetrated the thickness of the sleeve. Note the clustered appearance of the pits at preferred locations. (b) Cavitation pitt... More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 13 Steel upset forged between flat dies made on a screw press More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 15 MSC superforge simulation. Disc upset forged between flat dies, showing (a) start position and (b) end position after 74.93 mm (2.95 in.) stroke More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 25 Cavitation pitting fatigue. (a) Cavitation pitting on a gray cast iron diesel engine cylinder sleeve. The pitted area is several inches long, and the pits nearly penetrated the thickness of the sleeve. Note the clustered appearance of the pits at preferred locations. (b) Cavitation pitt... More
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Published: 01 November 2013
Fig. 14 Typical multiple-impression hammer dies for closed-die forging. Source: Ref 10 More
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Published: 01 November 2013
Fig. 16 Basic types of upsetter heading tools and dies, showing the extent to which stock is supported. (a) Unsupported working stock. (b) Stock supported in die impression. (c) Stock supported in heading tool recess. (d) Stock supported in heading tool recess and die impression. Source: Ref More
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Published: 01 November 2013
Fig. 18 (a) Dies used in roll forging. (b) Overhang-type roll forger that uses fully cylindrical dies. Source: Ref 10 More
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Published: 01 November 2013
Fig. 21 Dies and punches most commonly used in press-brake forming. (a) 90° V-bending. (b) Offset bending. (c) Radiused 90° bending. (d) Acute-angle bending. (e) Flattening, for three types of hems. (f) Combination bending and flattening. (g) Gooseneck punch for multiple bends. (h) Special More
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Published: 01 October 2012
Fig. 2.17 Components of three types of simple dies shown in a setup used for drawing a round cup. Source: Ref 2.16 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 11.16 Typical drop-hammer dies and formed parts More