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Published: 01 February 2005
Fig. 2.8 Isothermal forging with dies and workpiece at approximately the same temperature More
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Published: 01 February 2005
Fig. 12.9 Principles of and tooling for transverse rolling machine with straight dies. (a) Operation. (b) Assembly of simple die. [ Altan et al., 1973 ] More
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Published: 01 February 2005
Fig. A.3 Blocker and finish forging dies as mounted on the bolster of the mechanical press More
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Published: 01 February 2005
Fig. 16.11 Modified blocker design (broken lines) positioned in the open finisher dies (solid lines) [ Jenkins et al., 1989 ] More
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Published: 01 February 2005
Fig. 17.18 General nomenclature for extrusion dies. (a) Rod/tube extrusion. (b) Can extrusion [ ICFG, 1992 ] More
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Published: 01 February 2005
Fig. 23.15 Multiaction forming press with the dies and the forged gear [ Nakano, 1997 ] More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 13 Steel upset forged between flat dies made on a screw press More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 15 MSC superforge simulation. Disc upset forged between flat dies, showing (a) start position and (b) end position after 74.93 mm (2.95 in.) stroke More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 2 Examples of hot work dies for (a) press forging and (b) die casting. Courtesy of Villares Metals More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 25 Examples of heat checking cracks on aluminum die-casting dies. Cracks are white because they are filled with aluminum. Courtesy of Villares Metals More
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Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 14 Bottom die #8 in the stack exposed and intact after removal of 7 dies. The 10μm adhesive layer is intact and ready for removal to expose the die surface. More
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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 11 Cavitation pitting fatigue. (a) Cavitation pitting on a gray cast iron diesel-engine cylinder sleeve. The pitted area is several inches long, and the pits nearly penetrated the thickness of the sleeve. Note the clustered appearance of the pits at preferred locations. (b) Cavitation pitt... More
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Published: 01 October 2012
Fig. 2.17 Components of three types of simple dies shown in a setup used for drawing a round cup. Source: Ref 2.16 More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 25 Cavitation pitting fatigue. (a) Cavitation pitting on a gray cast iron diesel engine cylinder sleeve. The pitted area is several inches long, and the pits nearly penetrated the thickness of the sleeve. Note the clustered appearance of the pits at preferred locations. (b) Cavitation pitt... More
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Published: 01 November 2013
Fig. 14 Typical multiple-impression hammer dies for closed-die forging. Source: Ref 10 More
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Published: 01 November 2013
Fig. 16 Basic types of upsetter heading tools and dies, showing the extent to which stock is supported. (a) Unsupported working stock. (b) Stock supported in die impression. (c) Stock supported in heading tool recess. (d) Stock supported in heading tool recess and die impression. Source: Ref More
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Published: 01 November 2013
Fig. 18 (a) Dies used in roll forging. (b) Overhang-type roll forger that uses fully cylindrical dies. Source: Ref 10 More
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Published: 01 November 2013
Fig. 21 Dies and punches most commonly used in press-brake forming. (a) 90° V-bending. (b) Offset bending. (c) Radiused 90° bending. (d) Acute-angle bending. (e) Flattening, for three types of hems. (f) Combination bending and flattening. (g) Gooseneck punch for multiple bends. (h) Special More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 10.7 Example of titanium forged in open or flat dies as in blacksmithing (hand forging) More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 11.16 Typical drop-hammer dies and formed parts More