1-20 of 499 Search Results for

die steel

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Image
Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 17-6 Premature failure of a 5% Cr hot-work die steel caused by the severe stress-concentration effect of very sharp corners More
Image
Published: 01 February 2005
Fig. 21.1 Factors affecting die steel selection [ Nagpal et al., 1980 ] More
Image
Published: 01 February 2005
Fig. 21.2 Hot hardness of hot work die steels (measurements made after holding at testing temperature for 30 min.). Courtesy of Latrobe Steel Co. More
Image
Published: 01 February 2005
Fig. 21.3 Resistance of hot work die steels to softening during elevated-temperature exposure as measured by room-temperature hardness. Courtesy of Universal Cyclops Steel Corp. More
Image
Published: 01 February 2005
Fig. 21.4 Resistance of die steels to plastic deformation at elevated temperatures (values in parentheses indicate hardness at room temperature). Courtesy of Universal Cyclops Steel Corp. and A. Finkl and Sons Co. More
Image
Published: 01 February 2005
Fig. 21.8 Ductility of various die steels at high temperatures [ Nagpal, 1976a ] More
Image
Published: 30 September 2023
Figure 9.29: Effect of die angle on mean die pressure in drawing of steel strip using rapeseed oil as the lubricant. More
Image
Published: 01 December 2006
Fig. 7.79 Section die for the production of the steel section at right. The die aperture has a heavily rounded entry. The mantle surface of the die is cylindrical, with a shoulder for location in the die holder. Source: Krupp/Hoesch, Schwerte More
Image
Published: 30 September 2023
Figure 9.33: Effect of die cooling on wear rate in drawing of 0.6% C steel wire (patented, phosphate/soap lubrication, reduced from 4.5 to 4.0 mm diameter at 6 m/s). More
Image
Published: 30 September 2023
Figure 11.40: Die pressures and shear stresses measured in upsetting of mild steel at 1000°C to 50% reduction in height ( d 0 = 35 mm; h 0 = 21 mm). 1 - Dry; 2 - graphite in water; 3 - copper in bentone grease. More
Image
Published: 30 September 2023
Figure 12.3: Dependence of flank wear on punch-to-die clearance in cutting of steel blanks. More
Image
Published: 01 June 1985
Fig. 5-4. Normal hot rolled steel bar flow lines have been pressed into a forging-die cavity to strengthen the ultimate product. More
Image
Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 17 (a) Front view of an AISI O1 tool steel die that cracked during oil quenching. The die face contains holes that are close to the edge for safe quenching. (b) Side view of broken die halves showing the mating fracture surfaces and temper color (arrow) on the crack surfaces. Source: Ref More
Image
Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 23 Plastic mold die made from AISI S7 tool steel that was found to be cracked before use. A crack followed the lower recessed contour of the large gear teeth and had an average depth of 1.6 mm. Smaller cracks were also observed on the flat surfaces. Source: Ref 16 More
Image
Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 15 (a) A2 tool steel blanking die, 63 mm (2½ in.) in diameter by 13 mm (½ in.) thick, that cracked in service because of a brittle zone that had formed during electrical discharge machining (EDM) of the cavity at center. Arrows point to cracks emanating from the cavity. Source: Ref 7 More
Image
Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 66 Micrographs of a broken carburized P5 tool steel die. Note the layer of cementite along the surface and the heavy grain-boundary network in (a). The case was 59.5 HRC, and the core was 22 GRC. (a) The case is shown at an original magnification of 100× (100 μm bar). (b) The case More
Image
Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 2 Schematic cross section of an aluminum extrusion die made from H13 steel showing the bearing (wear) surface and a core with hardness of 38 to 44 HRC. Source: Ref 1 More
Image
Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 14 Gross heat checking in a low-alloy tool steel forging die due to excessive temperature. Heat checking occurred after an undetermined number of 225 kg (500 lb) nickel-base alloy preforms had been forged from an average temperature of 1095 °C (2000 °F). Source: Ref 11 More
Image
Published: 01 August 2012
Fig. 1.8 Effect of punch-die clearance on part edge quality in blanking DP590 steel of 1.4 mm (0.06 in.) thickness. Source: Ref 1.4 More
Image
Published: 01 August 2012
Fig. 16.3 (a) Use of inserts in a cast steel stamping die. CVD, chemical vapor deposition; PVD, physical vapor deposition. Source: Ref 16.8 . (b) Novel method of casting iron and steel. Source: Ref 16.23 More