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Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 January 2023
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.itfdtktmse.t56060001
EISBN: 978-1-62708-440-6
... Abstract This chapter presents the theory and practice associated with the application of thin films. The first half of the chapter describes physical deposition processes in which functional coatings are deposited on component surfaces using mechanical, electromechanical, or thermodynamic...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 January 2023
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.itfdtktmse.t56060013
EISBN: 978-1-62708-440-6
... Abstract This appendix provides a brief review of thin film deposition methods and their uses in a question and answer format. The questions deal with recommended practices, process conditions, terminology, and classifications. chamber pressure mean free path metallic components plasma...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 1999
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.caaa.t67870075
EISBN: 978-1-62708-299-0
... Abstract This chapter discusses three related corrosion mechanisms, galvanic, deposition, and stray-current corrosion, explaining why they occur and how they affect the corrosion process. It includes information on testing and prevention methods along with examples of the type of damage...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 January 2023
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.itfdtktmse.9781627084406
EISBN: 978-1-62708-440-6
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Published: 30 September 2023
Figure 6.18: Porous coating produced by electrochemical deposition of Sn and Zn, followed by selective etching of the Zn. (a) Side view; (b) top view. Source: Arentoft, et al. [ 75 ]. More
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Published: 01 December 2018
Fig. 6.120 Optical micrographs showing (a) heavy scale deposition on OD, trying to penetrate the metal from the gap between fins and external surface of the tube, 200×; (b) microstructure at the OD indicating general form of corrosion as metal dissolution and scale formation on external More
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Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 1 SPC chart example tracking TEOS deposition rate vs. run on a Lam Integrity deposition tool [1] . More
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Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 22.20 Hardness of coatings for tool materials. PVD, physical vapor deposition; CVD, chemical vapor deposition More
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Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 22.21 Physical vapor deposition coatings on cemented carbide substrates. (a) TiN. (b) TiCN. (c) TiAlN. Source: Ref 3 More
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Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 2 A) Trace reroute performed by He ion beam. B) Deposition of <30nm cobalt lines with He ion beam induced deposition. C) 40nm wide via milled with neon FIB and tungsten filled with helium ion beam induced deposition. More
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Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 18 Histogram of the deposition data from analysis of 4 process technology nodes (180nm, 65nm, 45nm, 28nm). [28] More
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Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 20 Histogram of FIB metal deposition length during the debug of a 90nm logic process [46] . More
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Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 34 An example of a FIB metal deposition on the four-point probe structure, with physical measurements labeled to be used for the resistivity calculation. [70] More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 11.10 Hardness of various physical vapor deposition (PVD) coatings and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) coatings used for tooling materials. Source: Ref 11.9 More
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Published: 01 June 2016
Fig. 1.10 Early Russian experimental results show that deposition efficiency increases dramatically above a given velocity and that this critical velocity varies for different materials. For example, in this plot the critical velocity for aluminum is higher than that for nickel or copper More
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Published: 01 June 2016
Fig. 2.2 Schematic of the mass change respective to the deposition efficiency with particle impact velocity, illustrating the concept of critical velocity. v crit denotes the velocity above which deposition takes place; v erosion marks the transition to hydrodynamic effects that cause More
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Published: 01 June 2016
Fig. 2.14 (a) Individual deposition efficiencies (DE) and (b) hard-phase contents in the powders and the coatings for cold spraying copper-tungsten blends of similar particle-size cuts. Cold spraying was performed with nitrogen at a process gas pressure of 4 MPa (580 psi) and a process gas More
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Published: 01 June 2016
Fig. 2.19 Attainable (a) deposition efficiencies (DE) and (b) tubular coating tensile (TCT) strengths for cold spraying copper in different powder size cuts as a function of the particle velocity excess with respect to critical velocity. Source: Ref 2.34 More
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Published: 01 June 2016
Fig. 2.20 Window of deposition for cold spraying copper as a function of particle temperature and velocity. The impact conditions for copper refer to process parameters by spraying with nitrogen as a process gas under (1, 2) p gas = 3 MPa (435 psi) and T gas = 300 °C (570 °F), using More
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Published: 01 June 2016
Fig. 3.25 Window of deposition illustrated on the plane of particle velocity and particle temperature for titanium powder sprayed with nitrogen and nozzle type D24 at 4 MPa (580 psi). The data points show impact conditions corresponding to particles of different sizes: (A) 10, (B) 25, and (C More