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cutting tools

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Image
Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 21.8 SiC w /Al 2 O 3 composite cutting tools. Source: Greenleaf Corporation More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 13.5 Tool geometry and nomenclature for single-point cutting tools More
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Published: 01 October 2012
Fig. 11.5 SiC w /Al 2 O 3 composite cutting tools. Courtesy of Greenleaf Corporation More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 4.24 Effect of cutting tool on hole expansion. Source: Ref 4.1 More
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Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 22.17 Elevated-temperature performance of cutting tool materials. Source: Ref 9 More
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Published: 01 July 2009
Fig. 21.1 Cutting tool designs used for beryllium and comparison of geometry with other metals Nomenclature Value (X°) for SS 304 Be Cast iron Nonferrous metal ab, back rake, deg 0 to (–7) +7 0 to –7 0 to 10 as, side rake, deg +6 to (–7) +5 +6 to –7 10 to 20 ϕs More
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Published: 01 November 2013
Fig. 15 Relative machining application ranges of cutting tool materials. Source: Ref 8 More
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Published: 01 November 2013
Fig. 17 Comparison of toughness and wear resistance for various cutting tool materials. Courtesy Metcut Research Associates, Inc. Source: Ref 8 More
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Published: 01 December 1984
Figure 3-75 Microstructure of a sintered carbide cutting tool made from an WC-Co alloy, 640 ×. More
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Published: 30 September 2023
Figure 13.41: Progression of grooving wear in cutting of 1055 steel with carbide tools and different lubricants ( v = 150 m/min, f = 0.05 mm, d = 0.2 mm). More
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2023
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.stmflw.t59390456
EISBN: 978-1-62708-459-8
.... This chapter covers the mechanics and tribology of metal cutting processes. It discusses the factors that influence chip formation, including tool and process geometry, cutting forces and speeds, temperature, and stress distribution. It reviews the causes and effects of tool wear and explains how to predict...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.emea.t52240411
EISBN: 978-1-62708-251-8
... steels, low-alloy special-purpose tool steels, mold tool steels, high-speed tool steels, and powder metallurgy tool steels. This chapter provides discusses the manufacturing process, composition, properties, types, and applications of these tool steels and other cutting tool materials, such as cemented...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ts5.t65900251
EISBN: 978-1-62708-358-4
... Abstract High-speed tool steels have in common the ability to maintain high hardness at elevated temperatures. High speed steels are primarily used for cutting tools that generate heat during high-speed machining. They are designated as group M or group T steels in the AISI classification...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 March 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.stg2.t61280189
EISBN: 978-1-62708-267-9
... Abstract The qualities that make superalloys excellent engineering materials also make them difficult to machine. This chapter discusses the challenges involved in machining superalloys and the factors that determine machinability. It addresses material removal rates, cutting tool materials...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2000
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ttg2.t61120079
EISBN: 978-1-62708-269-3
..., affect tool life, surface finish, and part tolerances. The chapter also includes a brief review of nontraditional machining methods. cutting fluids cutting speed cutting tools machinability titanium alloys The term machining has broad application and refers to all types of metal removal...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.mfub.t53740213
EISBN: 978-1-62708-308-9
... be achieved through conventional machining methods, the mechanics of chip formation, the factors that affect tool wear, the selection and use of cutting fluids, and the determination of machining parameters based on force and power requirements. It also includes information on nontraditional machining...
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Published: 30 September 2023
Figure 13.17: Spread of cutting zone with blunt tool (a) and cutting with a tool having a chamfered edge (b) More
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Published: 30 September 2023
Figure 13.27: Effects of cutting speed on tool life according to various tool life criteria in cutting of 0.25% C steel ( S ut = 410 MPa) with (a) HSS tool; (b) cemented TiC tool; (c) oxide ceramic tool. (Rake angles: +6° for HSS tool, − 5° for other tools). Refer to Fig. 13.24 More
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Published: 30 September 2023
Figure 13.31: Changes in tool life for different tool materials as functions of cutting speed ( VB = 0.5 mm). More
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 26-9 Tool life curves of typical tool materials, and effect of cutting speed on tool life More