1-20 of 850 Search Results for

crack growth

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Image
Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. 10.36 Small crack growth behavior doesn’t follow long-crack growth behavior; Nimonic 901 at room temperature (curves are from long-crack data, points are short crack data). Source: Ref 10.34 More
Image
Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 7.20 Parallel discontinuous growth bands in PS. Arrow indicates crack growth direction. Source: Ref 7.25 More
Image
Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 29 Schematic of a river pattern. Crack growth is in the direction of crack coalescence. River patterns may be visible at the macroscale in organic glasses and brittle polymers but are visible only at the microscale in metallic materials. Source: Ref 13 More
Image
Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 58 Influence of texture on fatigue crack growth in Ti-6Al-4V. Fatigue crack growth rates are higher when basal planes are loaded in tension. The elastic modulus in tension for the basal texture (B) is 109 GPa (15.8 × 10 6 psi); for the transverse texture (T), 126 GPa (18.3 × 10 6 psi More
Image
Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. 9.19 Relation of crack-tip yield zones in the Wheeler crack growth retardation model ( Ref 9.34 ). (a) Initial condition at overload. (b) Progress of crack through plastic zone of overload More
Image
Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 8.2 Crack growth resistance curve and crack driving force curves in R -curve format ( McCabe and Heyer, 1973 ). More
Image
Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 5.40 Fatigue crack growth behavior of 7075-T6 aluminum under remote and crack-line loading conditions. Source: Ref 5.41 More
Image
Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 7.5 Environmental subcritical crack growth in glasses. (a) Crack velocity as a function of environment and pH for vitreous silica glass. Source: Ref 7.5 . (b) Soda-lime glass tested at different temperatures. Source: Ref 7.5 . (c) Crack velocity curves for sapphire in moist air (25 °C More
Image
Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 14 A typical fatigue-crack growth-rate curve consists of three regions: a slow-growing region (threshold), a linear region (the middle section of the curve), and a terminal region toward the end of the curve where Δ K approaches K c . The Paris power-law equation, da/dN = C (Δ K More
Image
Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 18 Schematic representation of the R ratio effect on fatigue crack growth curves. The near-threshold, Paris regime, and final failure regions are also indicated on the curves. More
Image
Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 1.18 Effect of potential on the maximum crack growth rate in sensitized type 304 stainless steel in 0.1 MNa 2 SO 4 at 250 °C (480 °F). Numbers denote K I values. More
Image
Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 1.20 Schematic of crack growth rate vs. temperature for intergranular SCC of type 304 stainless steel More
Image
Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 1.28 Crack growth rate vs. elastic-plastic stress intensity for iron and nickel tested in 1 N H 2 SO 4 at given cathodic overpotentials (COP). (a) 2 mm (0.08 in.) thick iron and nickel. (b) 10 mm (0.4 in.) thick iron and nickel More
Image
Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 1.34 Stress-corrosion crack growth as a function of the two strain-rate thresholds, ε ˙ 1 and ε ˙ 2 More
Image
Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 1.38 Schematic of crack growth rate vs. temperature for (a) 3% Ni steel in water ( Ref 1.99 ) and (b) 4340 steel in gaseous hydrogen ( Ref 1.100 ) More
Image
Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 3.7 Fast crack growth of H-11 steel in water and hydrogen. Source: Ref 3.19 More
Image
Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 3.9 Schematic of slow-crack-growth kinetics in steels due to hydrogen embrittlement. (a) Growth rate as a function of applied stress intensity. (b) Stage 2 (II) growth rate as a function of temperature. Source: Ref 3.22 More
Image
Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 3.15 Crack growth rates in distilled water plotted as a function of K for three microstructures. The three microstructures are 4340 tempered at 300 °C (570 °F), 300M tempered at 470 °C (880 °F), and 300M isothermally transformed at 250 °C (480 °F) and then tempered at 300 °C. Source More
Image
Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 3.25 Crack growth rate as a function of stress intensity in steels B6 and B7 compared with that of steel B2. Source: Ref 3.40 More
Image
Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 3.30 Effect of aging temperature on crack growth rates in modified 18Ni-300 maraging steel. Source: Ref 3.8 More