1-20 of 636 Search Results for

corrosion potential

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Image
Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 9 Effects of applied potential and corrosion potential on the pitting- and crevice-corrosion initiation time for alloy 825 in 1000 ppm Cl − at 95 °C (203 °F). Note that at and below the repassivation potential, E rp no initiation occurs out to at least three years. Source: Ref 40 More
Image
Published: 01 July 2009
Fig. 25.6 Illustration showing the corrosion potential and corrosion current at the intersection of the anodic and cathodic reactions as represented schematically by zinc in acid solution. Source: Fontana 1986 More
Image
Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 5.16 Corrosion potential of 2535 as a function of temperature in Cl − + H 2 S systems: two concentrations of Cl − and three concentrations of H 2 S in the gas phase. The dots are experimental results, and the lines are predictions obtained from the model. Source: Ref 5.51 More
Image
Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 6.15 (a) Effect of radiation on the corrosion potential of type 304 stainless steel in 288 °C (550 °F) water. The curves denote the range of typical values in the unirradiated corrosion-potential data ( Ref 6.1 ). (b) Effect of radiation on the shift in corrosion potential from the value More
Image
Published: 01 July 2000
Fig. 7.11 Corrosion potential versus time during exposure of type 304 stainless steel at 25 °C to 0.4 M FeCl 3 . Source: Ref 26 More
Image
Published: 01 July 2000
Fig. 7.18 Change in corrosion potential of type 304 stainless steel with time at 25 °C in 1.5 wt% ferric chloride. Source: Ref 30 More
Image
Published: 01 July 2000
Fig. 7.78 Stress corrosion potential ranges of pipeline steel in hydroxide, carbonate-bicarbonate, and nitrate solutions in slow strain-rate test. Strain rate: 2.5 × 10 –6 s –1 . Arrows indicate open circuit corrosion potentials for each environment. Redrawn from Ref 68 More
Image
Published: 01 December 2006
Fig. 3 Effect of welding heat on microstructure, hardness, and corrosion potential of three aluminum alloy welded assemblies. (a) Alloy 5456-H321 base metal with alloy 5556 filler. (b) Alloy 2219-T87 base metal with alloy 2319 filler. (c) Alloy 7039-T651 base metal with alloy 5183 filler More
Image
Published: 01 July 1997
Fig. 3 Effect of welding heat on microstructure, hardness, and corrosion potential of three aluminum alloy welded assemblies. (a) Alloy 5456-H321 base metal with alloy 5556 filler. (b) Alloy 2219-T87 base metal with alloy 2319 filler. (c) Alloy 7039-T651 base metal with alloy 5183 filler More
Image
Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 5 Plot of corrosion potentials of pure aluminum and of binary Al-Cu alloys, plus the two stoichiometric precipitates. The binary alloys were fully solution heat treated and quenched as rapidly as possible to retain the maximum amount of copper in solid solution. Note that the addition More
Image
Published: 01 July 2000
Fig. 7.39 pH-potential diagram for copper used in the analysis of corrosion in Brussels water. Shaded regions indicate pH-potential conditions for corrosion. Vertical bar defines corrosion potential limits for pitting at pH = 8. Source: Ref 56 More
Image
Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 5.1 Schematic potential-pH diagram for a corrosion-resistant alloy indicating different regimes of environmentally assisted cracking. For simplicity, only the regions of iron stability are shown. More
Image
Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 14 Methods of corrosion control for iron related to the potential-pH diagram More
Image
Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 23 Mixed-potential theory diagram for the corrosion of zinc in a deaerated acid More
Image
Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 14 The effect of electrode potential and stress intensity on stress corrosion crack velocity in a high strength aluminum alloy (7079-T651). 2.5 cm thick plate. T-L crack orientation (long transverse grain direction normal to the fracture plane; longitudinal direction of crack propagation More
Image
Published: 01 July 2000
Fig. 4.5 Corrosion penetration profiles. (a) Corresponding to potential and current distribution of Fig. 4.3(a) . (b) Corresponding to potential and current distribution of Fig. 4.3(b) More
Image
Published: 01 July 2000
Fig. 7.71 Potential ranges of stress-corrosion cracking by (I) hydrogen embrittlement, (II) cracking of unstable passive film, and (III) cracking initiated by pits near the pitting potential. Vertical dashed lines define potential range over which nonpassivating type films may crack under More
Image
Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 14.12 Mixed-potential diagram showing the reduction in corrosion of titanium by coupling to palladium More
Image
Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 20 Linear polarization behavior for a metal at potentials near the corrosion potential. η represents the overpotential. More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2000
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cub.t66910049
EISBN: 978-1-62708-250-1
... energy and electrochemical potential, the effect of ionic concentration on electrode potential, and the corrosion behavior of a metal based on its potential-pH diagram. The corrosion (potential-pH) behavior of iron, gold, copper, zinc, aluminum, and titanium are described. Understanding the kinetics...