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cooling rate

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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 3.11 Continuous cooling diagram for a linear cooling rate. Derived from the isothermal transformation diagram shown in Fig. 3.9 for a plain carbon eutectoid steel. H, start of transformation to pearlite; I, finish of transformation to pearlite; J, start of transformation to upper More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 24.13 Schematic continuous cooling diagram for a typical tool steel. Cooling rates in decreasing order are represented by T 1 , T 2 , T 3 , and C i , P i , and B i represent the initiation of carbide, pearlite, and bainite formation, respectively. Source: Ref 24.26 More
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 24-52 Cooling curves and cooling rate curves at center of a 1.5 in. diameter probe quenched in unagitated hot water More
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 24-53 Cooling curves and cooling rate curves produced by (a) 80 °F, (b) 90 °F, (c) 140 °F, (d) 160 °F water flowing at 50 fpm past a 1.5 in. diameter bar More
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 24-54 Cooling curves and cooling rate curves in a 1 in. diameter stainless probe quenched in 5, 15, and 25% at 110 °F and flowing at 50 fpm More
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 24-55 Cooling curves and cooling rate curves in a 1 in. diameter stainless probe quenched in 10% PAG at 80, 100, and 120 °F and flowing at 50 fpm More
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 24-56 Cooling curves and cooling rate curves in a 1 in. diameter stainless probe quenched in 20% PAG 110 °F and flowing at 0, 50, and 100 fpm More
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Published: 01 December 1996
Fig. 4-3 Cooling rate as a function of cooling temperature derived from the curves in Fig. 4-2 . (From same source as Fig. 4-1a ) More
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Published: 01 August 2012
Fig. 7.7 Influence of strain rate. Cooling rate = 80 K/s (145 °F/s). Source: Ref 7.9 More
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Published: 01 August 2012
Fig. 7.8 Influence of strain rate at 500 °C (930 °F). Cooling rate = 80 K/s (145 °F/s). Source: Ref 7.9 More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 11.19 (Part 1) Effect of cooling rate on parent metal adjacent to weld. Butt weld in 19 mm normalized plate. 0.24C-1.59Mn (wt%) CE = 0.49. (a) Electroslag weld (30 kJ/mm heat input). 290 HV. Nital. 75×. (b) Submerged-arc weld (6 kJ/mm heat input). 425 HV. Nital. 75×. (c) Shielded More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 7.2 Transformation start temperatures as a function of (a) cooling rate and (b) associated transformation curves for various austenite transformation products in an Fe-0.01%C alloy. Source: Ref 7.6 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 12.22 Map of microstructures formed in austenite as a function of cooling rate in a low-carbon steel intercritically annealed to form 40% austenite and 60% retained ferrite. Source: Ref 12.48 More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 6.3 (Part 1) Effects of carbon content and cooling rate on annealed steels. This is a continuation of the series shown in Fig. 6.1 and 6.2 . (a) and (b) 1.2% C (1.18C-0.19Si-0.25Mn, wt%). Austenitized at 960 °C, cooled at 100 °C/h. 220 HV. 6 vol% cementite. (a) Picral. 100×. (b More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 2.12 Effect of cooling rate on development of final microstructure. Source: Ref 2.1 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 2.14 Block diagram of the effect of cooling rate on development of final microstructure. Source: Ref 2.1 More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 9.8 Differences in cooling rate patterns result in differences between isothermal transformation (IT) and continuous transformation (CT) diagrams More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 12.13 Typical cooling rate curves for several types of quenchants at 30 °C (85 °F) and not agitated. Source: Ref 12.22 More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 12.14 Cooling rate curves for two different oils. Source: Ref 12.24 More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 12.15 Cooling rate curves for conventional oil at 40 °C (105 °F), showing effects of agitation. Source: Ref 12.22 More