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Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 September 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.fahtsc.t51130601
EISBN: 978-1-62708-284-6
... Abstract This appendix is a collection of selected continuous cooling transformation diagrams for carbon steels; Mn steels; Mn-Mo, Mn-Ce, Mn-Ni-Mo, and Mn-Ni-CrMo steels; silicon steels; nickel steels; Ni-Cr-Mo steels; and chromium steels. continuous cooling transformation diagrams...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.spsp2.t54410197
EISBN: 978-1-62708-265-5
... Isothermal and continuous cooling transformation (CT) diagrams help users map out diffusion-controlled phase transformations of austenite to various mixtures of ferrite and cementite. This chapter discusses the application as well as limitations of these engineering tools in the context of heat...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 October 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.faesmch.t51270172
EISBN: 978-1-62708-301-0
... Abstract During a routine preflight inspection of a piston aircraft engine, part of a cooling fin was found that had broken off the cylinder. The piece, made of aluminum-silicon alloy, was cleaned and examined. Based on the fracture characteristics revealed by an electron microscope...
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Published: 01 December 2018
Fig. 8.5 Wheel mold cooling schematic for directional cooling More
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Published: 01 August 2015
Fig. 6.6 Cooling curves showing effect of temperature on cooling power. (a) Center cooling curves for water and 10% NaCl solution in quenching 18-8 stainless steel specimens 13 mm (0.5 in.) diam by 64 mm (2.5 in.). No agitation. (b) Center and surface cooling curves for 5% NaCl solution at 0.9 More
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Published: 01 August 2015
Fig. 6.11 Continuous cooling transformation diagram illustrating the critical cooling rate for complete martensitic transformation. M s : temperature at which transformation of austenite to martensite starts; M f : temperature at which transformation of austenite to martensite is completed More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 12.12 Construction used to convert the cooling curve of Fig. 12.11 to a cooling rate curve More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 25 Centerline cooling curves showing the effect of scale on the cooling curves of steels quenched in fast oil without agitation. (a) 1095 steel. Oil temperature: 50 °C (125 °F). (b) 18-8 stainless steel. Oil temperature: 25 °C (75 °F). Test specimens were 13 mm diam by 64 mm long (0.5 More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 3.11 Continuous cooling diagram for a linear cooling rate. Derived from the isothermal transformation diagram shown in Fig. 3.9 for a plain carbon eutectoid steel. H, start of transformation to pearlite; I, finish of transformation to pearlite; J, start of transformation to upper More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 3.12 Continuous cooling diagram defining the cooling rates used in typical heat treatment processes: A, full annealing; N, normalizing; Q, quenching. More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 24.13 Schematic continuous cooling diagram for a typical tool steel. Cooling rates in decreasing order are represented by T 1 , T 2 , T 3 , and C i , P i , and B i represent the initiation of carbide, pearlite, and bainite formation, respectively. Source: Ref 24.26 More
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 24-52 Cooling curves and cooling rate curves at center of a 1.5 in. diameter probe quenched in unagitated hot water More
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 24-53 Cooling curves and cooling rate curves produced by (a) 80 °F, (b) 90 °F, (c) 140 °F, (d) 160 °F water flowing at 50 fpm past a 1.5 in. diameter bar More
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 24-54 Cooling curves and cooling rate curves in a 1 in. diameter stainless probe quenched in 5, 15, and 25% at 110 °F and flowing at 50 fpm More
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 24-55 Cooling curves and cooling rate curves in a 1 in. diameter stainless probe quenched in 10% PAG at 80, 100, and 120 °F and flowing at 50 fpm More
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 24-56 Cooling curves and cooling rate curves in a 1 in. diameter stainless probe quenched in 20% PAG 110 °F and flowing at 0, 50, and 100 fpm More
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Published: 01 December 1996
Fig. 8-44 A continuous cooling TTT diagram for a structural steel, showing a cooling curve typically used in making sheet material. (From J.D. Grozier, in MicroAlloying 75 , p 241, Union Carbide Corp., New York (1977), Ref 21 ) More
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