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continuous carbon-fiber composites

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Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.scm.t52870001
EISBN: 978-1-62708-314-0
..., with construction and transportation being the largest. In general, high-performance but more costly continuous-carbon-fiber composites are used where high strength and stiffness along with light weight are required, and much lower-cost fiberglass composites are used in less demanding applications where weight...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ffub.t53610377
EISBN: 978-1-62708-303-4
..., damage tolerance, and testing and certification. composite laminates continuous carbon-fiber composites continuous-fiber polymer-matrix composites damage tolerance fatigue failure mechanisms A COMPOSITE MATERIAL can be defined as a combination of two or more materials that results...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 October 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.lmub.t53550385
EISBN: 978-1-62708-307-2
... the largest. In general, high-performance but more costly continuous carbon-fiber composites are used where high strength and stiffness along with light weight are required, and much lower-cost fiberglass composites are used for less-demanding applications where weight is not as paramount. Fig. 8.5...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 October 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.lmub.t53550001
EISBN: 978-1-62708-307-2
..., and, more recently, infrastructure. In general, high-performance but more costly continuous carbon-fiber composites are used where high strength and stiffness along with light weight are required, and much lower-cost fiberglass composites are used for less demanding applications where weight...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 October 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.lmub.t53550569
EISBN: 978-1-62708-307-2
..., continuous fiber ceramic composites, and carbon-carbon composites. It also describes a number of ceramic-matrix composite processing methods, including cold pressing and sintering, hot pressing, reaction bonding, directed metal oxidation, and liquid, vapor, and polymer infiltration. ceramic-matrix...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.scm.t52870373
EISBN: 978-1-62708-314-0
.... However, the applications of aramid composites continue to be limited by their poor compressive and off-axis properties and, in some applications, by their tendency to absorb water. Nonetheless, aramids will continue to be a fiber of choice when outstanding impact resistance is critical. 14.3 Carbon...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.scm.t52870573
EISBN: 978-1-62708-314-0
.... Carbon-carbon (C-C), carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP), ceramic matrix composite (CMC), carbon-silicon carbide (C-SiC), glass-ceramic matrix composite (GCMC), metal matrix composite (MMC), silicon-aluminum-oxygen-nitrogen (SIALON) While reinforcements such as fibers, whiskers, or particles...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.emea.t52240607
EISBN: 978-1-62708-251-8
..., superior damage tolerance compared to aluminum, higher bearing strengths than carbon/epoxy, 10% lighter weight than aluminum, and lower cost than carbon/fiber composite, although higher cost than aluminum. In addition to GLARE, the introduction of titanium foils in carbon/epoxy laminates (TiGr) has been...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.omfrc.t53030001
EISBN: 978-1-62708-349-2
... Fig. 1.1 Composite cross sections. (a) Sheet molding compound made from carbon-black-filled epoxy resin and chopped glass fiber. Bright-field illumination, 65 mm macrophotograph montage. (b) Quasi-isotropic unidirectional prepreg laminate. Slightly uncrossed polarized light, 5× objective...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.omfrc.9781627083492
EISBN: 978-1-62708-349-2
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.omfrc.t53030211
EISBN: 978-1-62708-349-2
...-matrix interface, as can be seen in Fig. 12.3(b) . The use of fiber-reinforced polymeric composite materials continues to increase throughout the world due to their unique performance attributes. These heterogeneous and anisotropic materials are commonly developed from carbon or glass fibers...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.scm.t52870489
EISBN: 978-1-62708-314-0
... are normally surface-treated to improve their adhesion to the polymeric matrix. Several other fibers are occasionally used for polymeric composites. Boron fiber was the original high-performance fiber before carbon was developed. It is a large-diameter fiber that is made by pulling a fine tungsten wire...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cfap.t69780276
EISBN: 978-1-62708-281-5
... reinforced with continuous fibers of two types in different proportions in EP matrix was investigated ( Ref 53 ). The wear behavior of hybrid UD composites containing fibers of glass and carbon in EP composite was also studied ( Ref 59 ). Figure 20 shows that the wear rates of these composites were lower...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 September 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cfw.t52860151
EISBN: 978-1-62708-338-6
... or merge completely into one another structures. although they act in concert. Normally, the components can be physically identified and C exhibit an interface between one another. carbon/graphite fiber. Fiber produced by the continuous filament. An individual rod of pyrolysis of organic precursor fibers...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.scm.t52870537
EISBN: 978-1-62708-314-0
... direction significantly greater than that of steel, with a density approximately one-third that of steel. In addition, carbon and graphite fibers quickly became less expensive than either boron or SiC monofilaments. However, Gr/Al composites are difficult to process: (1) the carbon fiber reacts...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.omfrc.t53030237
EISBN: 978-1-62708-349-2
... continue until only the fibers remain on the surface, further blocking the effect of UV light. Figure 14.4 shows the effect of 10 years of sunlight exposure on a composite material. In this image, it can be seen that the degradation has continued until the first ply of the carbon fibers. Unfortunately...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.scm.t52870031
EISBN: 978-1-62708-314-0
... as physical and mechanical property data for commercially important high-strength fibers. aramid fibers carbon fibers composite reinforcement glass fibers graphite fibers prepreg ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene fibers woven fabrics REINFORCEMENTS for composite materials can...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 October 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.lmub.t53550457
EISBN: 978-1-62708-307-2
... nonferrous alloy, and the reinforcement consists of high-performance carbon, metallic, or ceramic additions. Reinforcements, either continuous or discontinuous, may constitute from 10 to 70 vol% of the composite. Continuous fiber or filament (f) reinforcements include graphite, silicon carbide (SiC), boron...
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Published: 01 October 2012
Fig. 11.17 Turbopump assembly showing the carbon-fiber-reinforced SiC blisk (right) and a metal inducer and impeller mounted on its shaft. The use of continuous fiber ceramic-matrix composites for this application increases the temperature capability up to 1370 °C (2500 °F). Source: Ref 11.3 More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 1999
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.caaa.t67870179
EISBN: 978-1-62708-299-0
... by the commercial appearance of strong and stiff carbon fibers in the 1960s. Carbon fibers offer a range of properties, including an elastic modulus up to 966 GPa (140 psi × 10 6 ) and a negative coefficient of thermal expansion down to –1.62 × 10 −6 /°C (-0.9 × lO −6 /°F). However, carbon and aluminum...