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compressive testing

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Published: 30 April 2020
Fig. 9.2 Compressive testing relies on loading to induce fracture. Shown here are the simple right-circular cylinder geometry and the less frequently used catenary cylinder geometry. The compressive strength is determined by the fracture load divided by the cross-sectional area. More
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Published: 01 August 2012
Fig. 16.22 Twist compression test (TCT). (a) Schematic of the test. (b) Sample output of lubricant evaluation using TCT. COF, coefficient of friction. Source: Ref 16.65 More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 1 Gleeble test unit used for hot-tension and hot-compression testing. (a) Specimen in grips showing attached thermocouple wires and linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) for measuring strain. (b) Close-up of a test specimen. Courtesy of Duffers Scientific, Inc. More
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Published: 01 February 2005
Fig. 4.4 Compression test specimen. (a) View of specimen, showing lubricated shallow grooves on the ends. (b) Shape of the specimen before and after the test More
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Published: 01 February 2005
Fig. 4.5 Compression test tooling. [ Dixit et al., 2002 ] More
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Published: 01 February 2005
Fig. 4.14 Lead samples on the compression test die. [ Dixit et al., 2002 ] More
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Published: 01 February 2005
Fig. 4.16 Compression test specimen showing the effects of barreling. (a) Top view. (b) Front view. [ Dixit et al., 2002 ] More
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Published: 01 February 2005
Fig. 7.7 Metal flow in ring compression test. (a) Low friction. (b) High friction More
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Published: 01 February 2005
Fig. 7.8 Finite element model of ring compression test. (a) Initial ring. (b) Compressed ring (50% height reduction) (shear factor m = 0.1). ( Gariety et al., 2003 ) More
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Published: 01 February 2005
Fig. 7.9 Theoretical calibration curves for ring compression test having indicated OD: ID:thickness ratios. (a) 6:3:2 ratio. (b) 6:3:1 ratio. (c) 6:3:0.5 ratio. [ Altan et al., 1983 ] More
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Published: 01 February 2005
Fig. 18.1 Correction of flow stress data obtained from a compression test [ Altan et al., 2001 ] More
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Published: 01 December 2006
Fig. 5.9 Deformation behavior of the magnesium alloy MgAl6Zn in hot-compression tests in the temperature range between 200 and 220 °C (Source: Schmidt/Beck) More
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Published: 01 September 2011
Fig. 8.10 NASA short-beam compression test fixture. Source: Ref 8.50 More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 12.38 Fixture for static and fatigue compression testing at cryogenic temperatures. 1) split aluminum compression blocks, 2) stainless steel yokes, 3) aluminum alignment sleeve, 4) titanium rods, 5) lock collar. More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 12.39 Specimen configuration used for compression testing of laminates at cryogenic temperature; (a) square specimen; (b) round specimen. More
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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 8 Compression test of two steel cubes deep case hardened only on the top and bottom surfaces. A compressive force perpendicular to the case-hardened surfaces caused cracking (arrows) in the very hard (66 HRC) cases on both surfaces. The soft, ductile cores simply bulged under More
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Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 12.19 Barreling during compression test More
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Published: 01 August 2012
Fig. 5.5 Schematic of Mohr’s circle in uniaxial tensile and compression tests ( Ref 5.1 ) More
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Published: 01 August 2012
Fig. 7.7 Schematic of the twist compression test. T , applied torque; r , mean radius of the tool. Source: Ref 7.17 More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 19 Barreling during compression test. Source: Ref 2 More