1-20 of 1002 Search Results for

compressibility

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Image
Published: 01 July 2009
Fig. 4.13 Typical compressibility curves for beryllium as a function of temperature. Source: Killpatrick More
Image
Published: 01 November 2013
Fig. 2 Compressibility curves for various metal powders. Source: Ref 4 More
Image
Published: 01 November 2013
Fig. 3 Effect of residual carbon content on compressibility and green strength of water-atomized high-carbon iron. Pressed at 550 MPa (40 tsi) with 1% zinc stearate admixed. Symbols represent experimental data points. Source: Ref 4 More
Image
Published: 01 June 2007
Fig. 2.8 Influence of nickel content on compressibility of 316L stainless steel powder. (Martensite formation is a significant contributor to the loss of compressibility in samples containing 8% and less nickel.) Source: Ref 17 More
Image
Published: 01 June 2007
Fig. 2.10 Effect of chromium and nickel on compressibility of chrome-nickel steels. Source: Ref 19 . Reprinted with permission from MPIF, Metal Powder Industries Federation, Princeton, NJ More
Image
Published: 01 June 2007
Fig. 3.6 Correlation between compressibility and sintered transverse rupture strength of 316L powders of varying apparent densities. Source: Ref 34 More
Image
Published: 01 June 2007
Fig. 3.7 Effect of apparent density on green strength and compressibility of 316L stainless steel powders. Source: Ref 34 More
Image
Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 1.2 Mechanical deformations with which compressibility or bulk modulus is associated. More
Image
Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 1.15 Temperature variation of bulk modulus (reciprocal compressibility) for six metals. More
Image
Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 3 Elastic stress distribution: pure compression. T, tension. C, compression. (a) No stress concentration. (b) Surface stress concentrations. (c) Transverse hole stress concentration More
Image
Published: 01 June 1985
Fig. 6-6(b). Case microstructure (100×) of a high-compression area of one of the two intact teeth in the spiral bevel pinion shown in Fig. 6(a) . Note the altered martensite in the subsurface shear plane. These “butterfly wings” extended from 0.010 to 0.035 in. below the surface. More
Image
Published: 30 September 2023
Figure 7.3: Squeeze films in (a) upsetting; (b) ring compression; (c) plane-strain compression; and (d) backward extrusion. More
Image
Published: 30 September 2023
Figure 7.4: Comparison of lubricant performance in ring compression, plane-strain indentation, and wire-drawing of aluminum alloy 7075. More
Image
Published: 30 September 2023
Figure 7.10: Twist-compression test methods. More
Image
Published: 30 September 2023
Figure 11.13: Schematic illustration of the plane-strain compression test. More
Image
Published: 30 September 2023
Figure 11.15: Spread in plane-strain compression with (a) low friction and (b) high friction. More
Image
Published: 30 September 2023
Figure 11.24: Stages in the compression of metal powders. Reprinted by permission of Pearson Education, Inc. More
Image
Published: 30 September 2023
Figure 11.26: Coefficient of friction measured in low- and high-speed compression of 18-8 stainless steel to 30% reduction in height. More
Image
Published: 30 September 2023
Figure 11.42: Reductions obtained in plane-strain compression of Al-1.25%Mn alloy at a constant load (2% additive in light mineral oil base). More
Image
Published: 30 September 2023
Figure 11.45: Friction measured in cold compression of titanium rings with metal and PTFE films. More