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Published: 30 June 2023
Fig. 7.14 Still from the Reynolds Metal Company video “Aluminum on the March” (1956) More
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Published: 01 May 2018
FIG. 3.12 Andrew Carnegie in 1913. After selling his company in 1901, Carnegie became a philanthropist and gave away most of the fortune he made building his steel empire. More
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Published: 01 May 2018
FIG. 5.3 The Haynes-Apperson Company used 5% nickel alloy steel for the first time in an automobile. Source: Brian Snelson. More
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Published: 01 May 2018
FIG. 7.8 Three stainless autos built by the Ford Motor Company, the 1936 Ford, 1960 Thunderbird, and 1967 Lincoln. Source: Photo by Dean Shaw. More
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Published: 01 May 2018
FIG. 8.7 The Pittsburgh Reduction Company began producing WearEver aluminum cookware in 1902. Source: www.wearever.com . More
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Published: 01 May 2018
FIG. 11.10 McLouth Steel Company built the first basic oxygen furnace in the United States. This process would eventually replace all open hearths. Source: Wikimedia Commons/Jmk7. More
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Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. 3 An optical pyrometer. Courtesy of The Pyrometer Instrument Company More
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Published: 01 June 2010
Fig. 29 The Budd-Michelin rubber-tired train, purchased by the Reading Company, was officially named Rail Motor Car 65. Source: Thum, The Book of Stainless Steels , 1935 , p 429 More
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Published: 01 June 2010
Fig. 36 The first stainless steel aircraft built by the Budd Manufacturing Company on display in front of the Franklin Institute Museum in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Courtesy of Craig Clauser More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 4.1 Male and female tooling. Source: The Boeing Company More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 4.3 Example of a matched-die aluminum tool. Source: The Boeing Company More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 4.7 Eggcrate structures for bond tools. Photo Source: The Boeing Company More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 4.13 Numerical control (NC) machined master models. Source: The Boeing Company More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 5.3 Large ultrasonic ply cutter. Source: The Boeing Company More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 5.7 Composite tape layer delivery head. Source: The Boeing Company More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 5.11 V-22 aft fuselage. Source: The Boeing Company More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 9.21 Cocured unitized control surface. Source: The Boeing Company More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 9.27 Hollow mandrels to reduce tool mass. Source: The Boeing Company More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 9.29 Lay-up of a fuselage panel with cocured hats. Source: The Boeing Company More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 9.34 Principle of cobonding. Photo source: The Boeing Company More