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coalescence

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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 10 Scanning electron micrograph of microvoid coalescence More
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Published: 01 December 2018
Fig. 6.38 SEM micrograph showing coalescence of creep cavities along the grain boundaries, 5000× More
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Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 13.4 Microvoid coalescence during ductile failure. Source: Ref 3 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 9 Schematic showing the formation of microvoid coalescence More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 11 Microvoid coalescence as seen through the SEM More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 6 Microvoid coalescence during ductile failure. Source: Ref 2 More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 14 Microvoid coalescence in an aluminum-silicon alloy (A380) loaded in tension. (a) Fracture surfaces consist of cleaved particles (i.e., silicon) and ridged fracture of the aluminum. Original magnification: 200×. (b) Higher-magnification (1440×) view of boxed region. (c) Fractured More
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Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. 10.17 Vacancy formation. Coalescence of (a) two dislocations and (b) three dislocations More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 2.34 Effect of quasi-cleavage—mixed cleavage and microvoid coalescence—on the fracture surface appearance of 17-PH stainless steel. TEM p-c replica, 4900× More
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Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. 10.16 Sketch of dislocations coalescing to form a crack nucleus. Source: Ref 10.10 More
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Published: 01 March 2012
Fig. 7.9 The solid-liquid interface covered with coalesced L 2 phase. Cu-35.4Pb alloy, upward directional solidification, V = 2.2 μm/s. Source: Ref 7.8 as published in Ref 7.5 More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ffub.t53610055
EISBN: 978-1-62708-303-4
... Abstract This chapter discusses the causes and effects of ductile and brittle fracture and their key differences. It describes the characteristics of ductile fracture, explaining how microvoids develop and coalesce into larger cavities that are rapidly pulled apart, leaving bowl-shaped voids...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.jub.t53290137
EISBN: 978-1-62708-306-5
... Abstract Solid-state welding processes are those that produce coalescence of the faying surfaces at temperatures below the melting point of the base metals being joined without the addition of brazing or solder filler metal. This chapter discusses solid-state welding processes such as diffusion...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2004
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.tt2.t51060209
EISBN: 978-1-62708-355-3
... coefficients, and flow behavior determined in the isothermal hot tensile test. It also describes three often-overlapping stages of cavitation during tensile deformation, namely, cavity nucleation, growth of individual cavities, and cavity coalescence. cavitation deformation flow behavior Gleeble test...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 March 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.fdsm.t69870237
EISBN: 978-1-62708-344-7
... in creating dislocations, breaking up grains into subgrains, and causing microscopic imperfections to coalesce into larger flaws. It also discusses the factors that contribute to the development and propagation of fatigue cracks, including surface deterioration, volumetric and environmental effects, foreign...
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Published: 01 December 2006
Fig. 23 Scanning electron micrograph of the laboratory-induced fracture. Dimples are characteristic of microvoid coalescence, a ductile form of fracture. More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 32 Scanning electron micrograph illustrating ductile fracture surface topography. This fracture topography is identified as microvoid coalescence. More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 16 Influence of direction of principal normal stress on the shape of dimples formed by microvoid coalescence. TEM, transmission electron microscopy. Source: Ref 9 More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 2.23 Section through the neck area of a tensile specimen of copper showing cavities and crack formed at the center of the specimen as the result of void coalescence. Source: Ref 2.11 More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 33 Microscale quasi-cleavage fracture in an O1 tool steel tested at room temperature. Predominantly cleavage cracking with patches and ribbons of microvoid coalescence. Source: Ref 17 More