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cleavage fracture

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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 12 Cleavage-fracture model showing fracture direction, cleavage planes, and low-angle grain or subgrain boundary. Source: Ref 9 More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 36 Cleavage fracture in Armco iron showing a tilt boundary, cleavage steps, and river patterns. Transmission electron microscopy replica. Source: Ref 18 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 13 Cleavage fracture in a low-carbon steel, seen through an SEM. Cleavage fracture in a notched impact specimen of hot-rolled 1040 steel broken at –196 °C (–320 °F), shown at three magnifications. The specimen was tilted at an angle of 40° to the electron beam. The cleavage planes More
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Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 13-17 Cleavage fracture on overload fracture surface of H13 steel CVN specimen tempered at 500 °C (930 °F) for 3 h. TEM carbon replica. Source: Ref 9 More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 5.10 SEM micrograph of a cleavage fracture surface on a 1018 steel. Original magnification 160× More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 7 Cleavage fracture in hardened steel, viewed under the scanning electron microscope. Note progression of “river” marks in the direction of arrow. Grain boundaries were crossed without apparent effect. Original magnification at 2000× More
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Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 18.21 Hydrogen-embrittled steels. (a) Transgranular cleavage fracture in a hydrogen-embrittled annealed type 301 austenitic stainless steel. (b) Intergranular decohesive fracture in 4130 steel heat treated to 1280 MPa (185 ksi) and stessed at 980 MPa (142 ksi) while being charged More
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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 13 Cleavage fracture in hardened steel showing numerous “river” marks. The overall direction of crack propagation is in the direction of the arrow (i.e., downstream). New river patterns are created where grain boundaries were crossed. 125×. More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 7.29 Cleavage fracture in soda lime glass. Crack progresses from left to right. (a) Fracture surface shows the initiation region (featureless mirror region), surrounded by the mist and hackle marks. (b) Geometry of a tensile test bar showing position of fracture surface normal to tensile More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 31 River lines on a cleavage fracture surface. Direction of growth is parallel to the direction of crack coalescence, as indicated by the arrow. Cracks must reinitiate at a boundary containing a twist (mode III) deformation component. Source: Ref 16 More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 33 Microscale quasi-cleavage fracture in an O1 tool steel tested at room temperature. Predominantly cleavage cracking with patches and ribbons of microvoid coalescence. Source: Ref 17 More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 34 Schematic of cleavage fracture formation showing the effect of subgrain boundaries. (a) Tilt boundary. (b) Twist boundary. Source: Ref 18 More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 2.30 Cleavage fracture from bend testing of 201 nickel in hydrogen atmosphere. (a) Ledgelike character of cleavage facets with small tongues on the bright facet (SEM, original magnification at 2000×). (b) Lower magnification view (original magnification at 500×) with higher-magnification More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 2.31 Cleavage fracture in Armco iron broken at −196 °C (−321 °F), showing river patterns, tongues, and (from bottom right to top left) a grain boundary. TEM p-c replica, 3000× More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 2.33 Cleavage fracture in a low-carbon martensitic steel. (a) Light microscope cross section with nickel plating at top showing the fracture profile. (b) Direct light photograph. (c) Direct SEM fractograph. (d) Light fractograph of replica. (e) SEM fractograph of replica. (f) TEM More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 35 Examples of cleavage fractures. (a) Twist boundary, cleavage steps, and river patterns in an Fe-0.01C-0.24Mn-0.02Si alloy that was fractured by impact. (b) Tongues (arrows) on the surface of a 30% Cr steel weld metal that fractured by cleavage. Source: Ref 18 More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 2.35 Fracture model showing a cleavage step blending with a tear ridge in a quasi-cleavage fracture surface. At top left is the lower surface of a fracture, showing a step at the lower left and a ridge at the upper right. At right and at bottom are sections through the fractured member More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 37 Examples of cleavage fractures. (a) Feather pattern on a single grain of a chromium steel weld metal that failed by cleavage. (b) Cleavage steps in a Cu-25at.%Au alloy that failed by transgranular stress-corrosion cracking. Courtesy of B.D. Lichter, Vanderbilt University. Source: Ref More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 November 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.uhcf3.t53630063
EISBN: 978-1-62708-270-9
... Abstract From a fundamental standpoint, there are only two modes, or ways, in which metals can fracture under single, or monotonic, loads: shear and cleavage. There are fracture modes other than shear and cleavage. These include intergranular and quasi-cleavage fracture modes for single-load...
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 19.21 Flat cleavage facets and microvoids on fracture surface of 4340 steel containing 0.003% P and tempered at 350 °C (662 °F). Specimen was broken by impact loading at room temperature. Source: Ref 19.49 More