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chromium steels

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Published: 01 May 2018
FIG. 7.1 Leon B. Guillet studied high-chromium steels for the first time. More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 13.2 Oxidation of chromium steels at 1000 °C (1830 °F). Source: Ref 13.3 , p 461 More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 7.19 Corrosion rates of chromium steels (0–5% Cr) generated from laboratory tests in H 2 -H 2 S at hydrogen pressures of 12 to 34 atm (175 to 500 psig) as a function of H 2 S concentration and temperature. IPY, inch per year. Source: Ref 48 More
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Published: 01 December 1989
Fig. 8.13. Thermal-expansion data for various chromium steels ( Ref 51 ). More
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 24-20 Isothermal transformation diagram for various 12% chromium steels More
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Published: 01 June 2010
Fig. 5 P.A.E. Armstrong, who developed silicon-chromium steels used for gas engine exhaust valves. Source: Thum, 1933 , p 486 More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ts5.t65900203
EISBN: 978-1-62708-358-4
... Abstract The high-carbon, high-chromium tool steels, designated as group D steels in the AISI classification system, are the most highly alloyed cold-work steels. This chapter describes the microstructures and hardenability of high-carbon, high-chromium tool steels and discusses the processes...
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 2.28 Feather pattern on a single grain of a chromium steel weld metal that failed by cleavage More
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Published: 31 December 2020
Fig. 8 End-quench hardenability of (a) 4130, (b) 4140, and (c) high-chromium steels. Source: Ref 10 More
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Published: 01 December 2018
Fig. 8.2 Steam-side scale formation for 1–3% chromium ferritic steels correlated with the Larson–Miller parameter. Source: Ref 8.10 More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 3.8 Effects of chromium and/or silicon on the oxidation resistance of steels in air. Source: Ref 16 More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 13.16 Effect of chromium on sulfidation resistance of steels containing various amounts of chromium tested at 400 °C (750 °F) in N 2 -15H 2 O-10CO 2 -10H 2 -0.1O 2 -0.1H 2 S. Source: Ref 44 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 7.10 Secondary hardening in steels containing chromium and molybdenum. Source: Ref 7.2 More
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Published: 31 December 2020
Fig. 12 Effect of carbon content on hardenability of chromium 51 xx H-steels. The minimum end-quench hardenability with number adjacent to each curve indicates the carbon content of the steel. Source: Ref 11 More
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Published: 01 June 2007
Fig. 2.10 Effect of chromium and nickel on compressibility of chrome-nickel steels. Source: Ref 19 . Reprinted with permission from MPIF, Metal Powder Industries Federation, Princeton, NJ More
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Published: 01 June 2007
Fig. 5.44 Solubility of nitrogen in chromium-nickel steels in equilibrium with gaseous nitrogen or nitrides, depending on temperature and partial pressure of nitrogen. Source: Adapted from Ref 52 More
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Published: 01 December 1989
Fig. 8.12. Thermal conductivities of iron, chromium, ferritic steels, and austenitic alloys ( Ref 51 ). More
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Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 13-6 Jominy end-quench hardenability curves for chromium hot-work tool steels. Courtesy of Teledyne VASCO Curve Type Composition, % Austenitizing temperature C Si Cr W Mo °C °F 1 H12 0.35 0.92 4.76 1.42 1.45 1010 1850 2 ... 0.96 0.29 3.93 More
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Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 13-15 CVN impact toughness of various chromium H-type steels as a function of testing temperature. Note that the as-tempered hardness of the steels varied. Data from Ref 3 , Allegheny Ludlum Industries and Crucible Steel Co. Type Composition, % Hardening temperature Hardening More
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 24-37 End-quench hardenability of chromium (5130) cast steels More