1-20 of 578 Search Results for

chromium oxide

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Image
Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 7.27 Formation of external sulfides on top of the chromium oxide scale and the formation of internal sulfides. Source: Ref 14 More
Image
Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 13.1 Schematic diagram illustrating oxide scale development on nickel-chromium-aluminum alloys with time. (a) Conversion of a thin alloy surface layer to oxide by rapid uptake of oxygen. The oxide phases formed are determined by the composition of the alloy. (b) Diffusion within the alloy More
Image
Published: 01 June 2007
Fig. 41 Chromium line scan of oxide scale on PM 409L, showing alternate bands of iron oxide and spinel. Anchoring of the scale is also seen at a surface pore. Good bonding between the scale formed and the PM stainless steel leads to minimal loss of mass thickness in cyclic oxidation test More
Image
Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 13.9 Micrographs showing the formation of sulfide and nitride phases beneath the external oxide scales on nickel (top) and chromium (bottom) metals. Nickel exposed in flowing SO 2 for 8 h at 1000 °C (1832 °F). Chromium oxidized in air for 17 h at 1200 °C (2092 °F) More
Image
Published: 01 July 2000
Fig. 5.19 Potentiostatic polarization curve for pure chromium in hydrogen-saturated (deaerated) 1 N H 2 SO 4 at 25 °C. Dashed section is a cathodic “peak” where the hydrogen-ion reduction dominates over the passive chromium oxidation. Redrawn from Ref 9 More
Image
Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 13.2 Oxidation of chromium steels at 1000 °C (1830 °F). Source: Ref 13.3 , p 461 More
Image
Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 61 Effect of chromium content of steel on the depth of oxidation More
Image
Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 20-20 The effect of chromium on oxidation resistance at 1832 °F (1000 °C) (48 h exposure, 0.5-in. cubes) More
Image
Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 22-9 Effect of varying nickel and chromium on the cyclic oxidation resistance of cast heat resistant alloys. The “service temperature” is defined as the temperature which results in an oxidation rate of 1 mm per year. Data are based on 500 hour tests at 1050 and 1150 °C (1922 and 2102 °F More
Image
Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 3.8 Effects of chromium and/or silicon on the oxidation resistance of steels in air. Source: Ref 16 More
Image
Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 3.10 Effect of chromium content on oxidation of Fe-Cr alloys at 1000 °C (1830 °F) in 0.13 atm O 2 . Source: Ref 18 More
Image
Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 8.19 Effect of chromium in Fe-Cr alloys on the oxidation resistance of the alloys at 850 °C (1560 °F) in air. Source: Ref 31 More
Image
Published: 01 June 2010
Fig. 20 Effect of chromium on corrosion and oxidation resistance of steel. (a) Iron-chromium alloys exposed for 10 years to corrosion and rusting in an industrial atmosphere. (b) Oxidation penetration of ½ inch cubes exposed to air for 48 hours at 1000 °C. Source: Zapffe, 1949 , p 31, 32 More
Image
Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 6 Schematic of paralinear oxidation as a result of evaporation of chromium superoxide More
Image
Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 13 Variation of parabolic oxidation rate with chromium level and temperature. Source: Ref 18 More
Image
Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 14 Influence of nickel on oxidation of iron-chromium alloys. Source: Ref 19 More
Image
Published: 01 December 2001
Fig. 5 Effect of chromium content on the oxidation behavior of alloy cast irons More
Image
Published: 01 December 2001
Fig. 32 Effect of chromium and/or silicon on the oxidation resistance of steels in air. Source: Ref 13 More
Image
Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 24 Effects of chromium and/or silicon on the oxidation rate of steels in air versus temperature. Source: Ref 135 More
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.hss.t52790007
EISBN: 978-1-62708-356-0
... Métiers, published a series of research papers on iron-chromium alloys having carbon contents acceptably low for modern stainless steel analyses. He made his steels with carbon-free Goldschmidt chromium (oxide ore reduced to chromium with powdered aluminum) and controlled the carbon contents so...