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chromium manganese steel (low alloy chromium steel, general)

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Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2007
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.smnm.t52140055
EISBN: 978-1-62708-264-8
... Abstract Steels contain a wide range of elements, including alloys as well as residual processing impurities. This chapter describes the chemical composition of low-alloy AISI steels, which are classified based on the amounts of chromium, molybdenum, and nickel they contain. It explains why...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 December 2020
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.phtbp.t59310095
EISBN: 978-1-62708-326-3
... Abstract This chapter describes the designations of carbon and low-alloy steels and their general characteristics in terms of their response to hardening and mechanical properties. The steels covered are low-carbon steels, higher manganese carbon steels, boron-treated carbon steels, H-steels...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.aub.t61170123
EISBN: 978-1-62708-297-6
... Low-Alloy Steels for Pressure Vessels and Piping A variety of low-alloy steels containing from 0.10 to 0.30% C and up to 10% total alloy are used for welded pressure vessels and piping. Alloy additions include manganese, silicon, molybdenum, chromium, nickel, vanadium, copper, and niobium. Table...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.mnm2.t53060175
EISBN: 978-1-62708-261-7
... manganese, silicon, or copper in quantities greater than those for the carbon steels, or they have specified ranges or minimums for one or more of the other alloying elements such as nickel, chromium, molybdenum, and so forth. Sometimes alloy steels are further defined as being either low-alloy steel...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.aub.t61170242
EISBN: 978-1-62708-297-6
... that are able to store and transport liquified gas. For low magnetic permeability, these alloys have a lower carbon content than the standard manganese steels. The corresponding loss in yield strength is compensated for by alloying with vanadium, nitrogen, chromium, molybdenum, and titanium. Chromium also...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ssde.t52310027
EISBN: 978-1-62708-286-0
... and knowledge of the environmental variables for a stainless steel component ensure that the alloy is used in the passive state, at which uniform corrosion occurs at a very low rate. Among the important media with which we encounter uniform, but acceptably controlled, corrosion in stainless steel...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 March 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.mgppis.t60400001
EISBN: 978-1-62708-258-7
...), the selected references listed at the end of the Chapter, and in the Appendix . Classification of Steels Generally, the carbon and low-alloy steels come under a classification system based on composition. The higher-alloy steels (the stainless, heat-resistant, wear-resistant steels, etc.) can...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.emea.t52240371
EISBN: 978-1-62708-251-8
... structural steels, SAE/AISI alloy steels, high-fracture-toughness steels, maraging steels, austenitic manganese steels, high-strength low-alloy steels, dual-phase steels, and transformation-induced plasticity steels. alloying elements mechanical properties low-alloy structural steels SAE/AISI alloy...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ssde.t52310001
EISBN: 978-1-62708-286-0
..., welding, or annealing as well as by corrosion. All stainless alloys rely on having a uniform level of chromium and the other element, molybdenum, which assists in corrosion resistance, distributed throughout the matrix. If there are locally low levels of these elements, localized resistance...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1995
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.sch6.t68200253
EISBN: 978-1-62708-354-6
.... Manganese steels use inexpensive raw materials and require no expensive consumables during manufacture. Thus, the economics of using manganese steels is attractive whenever low strengths are acceptable and the application work hardens the wear surface to 500 BHN (51 R c ) or higher. Low Alloy Steels...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.hss.t52790007
EISBN: 978-1-62708-356-0
... similar to ordinary steel. The alloy was highly abrasion resistant and was used in mining and railroad equipment. Discovery of Low-Carbon Ferrochromium (1895) A German chemist, Hans Goldschmidt (1861–1923), discovered a method for producing low-carbon ferrochromium and chromium metal...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 March 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.pht2.t51440125
EISBN: 978-1-62708-262-4
... a sulfide that has a relatively low melting point. When the steel freezes, this sulfide solidifies in the grain boundaries. On subsequent reheating for rolling or forging, it tears or breaks apart. If manganese is added, it combines preferentially with the sulfur and forms a manganese sulfide of higher...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2018
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.fibtca.t52430027
EISBN: 978-1-62708-253-2
... Chromium is one of the most important alloying elements in steel. Low-alloy steels have chromium in the range of 0.50 to 1.50 wt.%, whereas high-alloy steels such as stainless steels and heat-resistant steels have about 12.0 to 25.0 wt.% chromium. Chromium increases response to heat treatment. It increases...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ssde.t52310181
EISBN: 978-1-62708-286-0
... and reduces ductility of stainless steel. Machine and tool setup require more rigidity. Chromium allows chips to begin breaking. Carbon Carbon content increases strengthen stainless steels and promote carbide formation. Low carbon levels, typical in ferritic stainless steels, do not help machinability...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ssde.t52310069
EISBN: 978-1-62708-286-0
... the variation of martensite formation with temperature and true strain for 304. Martensite formed in these alloys is quite stable and does not revert until heated well above the temperatures ( Fig. 5 ) at which it was formed. The carbon levels of austenitic stainless steels are always relatively low, so strain...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.aub.t61170210
EISBN: 978-1-62708-297-6
... group S steels, are manganese, silicon, chromium, tungsten, and molybdenum, in various combinations. Carbon content is about 0.50% for all group S steels, which produces a combination of high strength, high toughness, and low-to-medium wear resistance. Group S steels are used primarily for chisels...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.aub.9781627082976
EISBN: 978-1-62708-297-6
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1999
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cmp.t66770011
EISBN: 978-1-62708-337-9
... transformation characteristics when no manganese and chromium depletion takes place. This suggests that with carbon contents over ~0.15%, free ferrite is unlikely to be produced in sections equivalent to ~400 mm (16 in.), but low-carbon bainite will form. Many case-hardening steels have hardenabilities less...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.mnm2.t53060001
EISBN: 978-1-62708-261-7
..., the technology was not available in his time to produce alloys with a combination of low carbon and high chromium that is found in most modern stainless steels. The alloys collectively known today as stainless steels were developed between 1904 and 1912 by seven different researchers living in France, Germany...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cpi2.t55030176
EISBN: 978-1-62708-282-2
... higher-chromium stainless steels, such as type 310S (S31008) and alloy 800 (N08800), as well as silicon-containing stainless steels, such as S30600 and S30601, have been used for very hot, concentrated nitric acid. The ferritic stainless steel E-Brite (S44627) as well as the low-carbon version...