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cast steel

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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 3.21 Microstructure of an AISI/SAE 4340 cast steel gear in the (a) as-cast condition consisting of dendrites of bainite (gray etching constituent) and interdendritic regions of ferrite (light etching constituent) and pearlite (dark etching constituent), (b) carburized condition More
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 3-24 Comparison of Young’s modulus for wrought alloys, cast irons and cast steel ( 1 ) More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 15.4 Austenite dendrites in a 1.6% C as-cast steel revealed with Stead’s etch More
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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 3 Low-carbon cast steel test specimen emphasizing 45° shear aspect of tensile fracture of a ductile metal. Diagonal ridges are “Lüders lines” or “stretcher strains”; porosity in the steel shows many localized fractures. More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 30 Cast steel after carburizing. Original magnification: 100× More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 38 A cast steel feedwater-pump impeller severely damaged by cavitation. Note how damage is confined to the outer edges of the impeller where vane speed was maximum. Source: Nalco Chemical Company More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 8.38 Cast steel with 0.25% C. The sample was etched in two steps using two different etchants. The top part of the sample was etched with 1% nital and shows the ferrite-pearlite microstructure, characteristic of this steel at room temperature in the “as cast” condition, without further More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 8.68 Micrograph of as-cast steel containing a network of iron sulfide. The low melting point of the sulfide makes it the last to solidify, forming the network (or continuous “films”) on the grain boundaries. The material is then brittle at high temperature (“hot shortness”) (see Fig More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 8.69 Micrographs of as-cast steel containing iron sulfide network (a) and globular manganese sulfide (b). No etching. The amount and size of the nonmetallic inclusions shown in this and Fig. 8.68 are almost impossible to find in modern steels produced with current refining processes More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 8.71 A large oxide nonmetallic inclusion in a cast steel, quenched and tempered. Clearly the reaction between the inclusion and the steel has been stopped by the end of the part solidification. There is a “crown” of small oxide particles around the inclusion. This probably results from More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 8.73 (a) Oxide inclusion in as-cast steel. The sperical shape of the inclusion may indicate that it precipitated in the liquid state of the steel. SEM, SE. (b) EDS spectrum from the nonmetallic inclusion. The calculated quantitative analysis from the EDS data is listed on the right More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 8.74 (a) Oxide inclusion in as-cast steel. The inclusion is composed of two phases with different chemical compositions. SEM, BE. (b) The dark, polygonal phase is an oxide containing magnesium and aluminum, probably high melting point spinel (MgAl 2 O 4 ). Its shape indicates it has More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 8.76 (a) Sulfide nonmetallic inclusion in as-cast steel. SEM, BE. No etching (b) EDS spectrum of the inclusion. Quantitative analysis calculated from EDS results. Manganese sulfide. More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 8.77 Micrograph of as-cast steel with a high concentration of polygonal manganese sulfide inclusions (sometimes called type III sulfide). Etchant: nitric acid. More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 8.78 Micrograph of as-cast steel. High concentration of dendritic manganese sulfide (sometimes called type II sulfide). No etching. More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 8.81 “Rock candy” fracture surface in cast steel, embrittled by the precipitation of aluminum nitride on the grain boundaries during solidification. Source: Ref 31 , 39 More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 8.82 “Rock candy” fracture surface in cast steel, embrittled by the precipitation of aluminum nitride on the grain boundaries during solidification. SEM, SE. Source: Ref 31 , 39 More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 9.58 Cast steel containing C = 0.43%, Cu = 0.13%, and P = 0.085%. Normalized after 2 h austenitization at 950 °C (1740 °F). Heterogeneous microstructure containing ferrite and pearlite, indicating heterogeneous austenite. The difference in response to etching (lighter regions) is caused More
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Published: 31 December 2020
Fig. 4 End-quench hardenability limits for the hardenability grades of cast steel specified in SAE J435c. The nominal carbon content of these steels is 0.30% C. Manganese and other alloying elements are added as required to produce castings that meet these limits. More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 3 Low-carbon cast steel test specimen emphasizing 45° shear aspect of tensile fracture of a ductile metal. Diagonal ridges are Lüders lines or stretcher strains; porosity in steel shows many localized fractures. Source: Ref 1 More