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Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2018
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.msisep.t59220583
EISBN: 978-1-62708-259-4
... Abstract This chapter discusses the effect of composition and cooling rate on the microstructure and properties of cast irons and explains how they differ from steel. It describes the conditions under which white, gray, mottled (chilled), and nodular (ductile) cast irons are produced...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.mnm2.t53060247
EISBN: 978-1-62708-261-7
... Abstract The commercial relevance of cast irons is best understood in the context of the iron-carbon phase diagram, where their composition places them near the eutectic point, which sheds light on why they melt at lower temperatures than steel and why they can be cast into more intricate...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.emea.t52240453
EISBN: 978-1-62708-251-8
... Abstract The properties of cast iron are determined primarily by the form of carbon they contain, which in turn, is controlled by modifying compositions and cooling rates during casting. Certain alloys (such as Si, Al, Ni, Co, and Cu) promote graphite formation, while others (such as S, V, Cr...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2007
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.smnm.t52140175
EISBN: 978-1-62708-264-8
... Abstract This chapter discusses the composition, properties, microstructure, grain formation, and fracture behavior of gray, white, ductile, and malleable cast iron and how these critical factors are affected when iron is heated to different temperatures prior to or during solidification...
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Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 13 Anaerobic biological corrosion of cast iron. (a) Cast iron pipe section exhibiting external pitting caused by bacteria. (b) Cast iron pipe showing penetration by bacteria-induced pitting corrosion. Source: Ref 10 More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 16.11 Microstructures of ductile cast iron (top) and malleable cast iron (bottom). Source: Ref 16.9 More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 5.7 Properly polished sample of eutectic cast iron (see Chapter 17, “Cast Irons,” in this book). The patterns visible on the surface result from the relief created by polishing a material with constituents having large differences in hardness. More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 17.5 Cooling curves (schematic) of (a) gray cast iron, (b) white cast iron, and (c) mottled cast iron. In addition to the stable and metastable eutectic temperatures, the temperatures at the start of the solidification of the pro-eutetic austenite (T ℓ ) and the end of solidification (T f More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 17.65 Mottled cast iron. Dark areas are gray cast iron. The rest of the cross section is white cast iron. Etchant: picral. More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 2.50 Mottled pearlitic cast iron. Gray iron at upper left and white iron at lower right of photo. 4% picral etch. 250× More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 17.40 Gray cast iron C = 3.18%, Si = 2.5%, P = 0.62%. As cast. Graphite flakes and fine microstructure composed of pearlite and interdendritic areas with steadite. Etchant: picral More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 17.56 Gray cast iron, as cast. C = 3.25%, Si = 1.82%, P = 0.48%. Pearlite, ferrite, lamellar graphite, and steadite. Hardness: 108 HB. Etchant: picral. More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 17.107 Malleable cast iron, as cast (before the malleabilization heat treatment). The region close to the surface (to the right of the image) shows the formation of graphite due either to deviation in chemical composition or changes caused by the mold material. Courtesy of J. Sertucha More
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 12-3 Cope and drag halves of a machined cast iron pattern (foreground) and cast iron core boxes (background) used for high production, close tolerance shell mold castings More
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Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. 2 Typical microstructures of four types of cast iron. (a) Gray iron showing graphite flakes (black) in a pearlite matrix. 380×. (b) White cast iron showing massive carbides (white) and pearlite. 380×. Malleable iron showing graphite nodules in a ferrite matrix. 380×. (d) Ductile iron More
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Published: 01 March 2001
Fig. 2 Cross sections of laser-melted cast iron surfaces. (a) Gray iron. (b) Ductile iron. Source: Ref 3 More
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Published: 01 January 2022
Fig. 7.46 High-alloy cast iron and white iron. Source: Ref 3 More
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Published: 01 January 2022
Fig. 13.18 Cast iron brake rotor and ductile iron brake caliper assembly More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 April 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.tpsfwea.t59300179
EISBN: 978-1-62708-323-2
... Abstract This chapter covers the friction and wear behaviors of cast irons. It describes the microstructure and metallurgy of gray, white, malleable, and ductile cast irons, their respective tensile properties, and their suitability for applications involving friction, various types of erosion...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 December 2020
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.phtbp.t59310331
EISBN: 978-1-62708-326-3
... Abstract Cast irons, like steels, are iron-carbon alloys but with higher carbon levels than steels to take advantage of eutectic solidification in the binary iron-carbon system. Like steel, heat treatment of cast iron includes stress relieving, annealing, normalizing, through hardening...