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case hardening

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Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 March 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.pht2.t51440141
EISBN: 978-1-62708-262-4
... Abstract This chapter discusses hardening processes that involve changes in surface composition. These case hardening treatments are broadly classified into four groups: carburizing, carbonitriding, nitriding, and nitrocarburizing. Key parameters and operating considerations for each treatment...
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Published: 01 December 1999
Fig. 4.15 Rotating beam fatigue strength of case-hardening, through- hardening, and tool steels as a function of surface hardness. Source: Ref 21 More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 9.33 Deep case hardening of 20-foot axles. Courtesy of Ajax Tocco Magnethermic More
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Published: 01 December 2006
Fig. 3.68 Extruded bars with helical gear teeth in case-hardening steel (Source: ASEA) More
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Published: 01 December 1999
Fig. 6.5 Hardenability ranges for two case-hardening grades of steel. Source: Ref 2 More
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Published: 01 December 1999
Fig. 3.12 Geometric models of carbides formed during case-hardening. A,B, and C are 3 grains (parted). (a) Massive carbide, 4000×. (b) Film carbide, 2000×. (c) Intragranular carbide, 4000×. Source: Ref 19 More
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Published: 01 December 1999
Fig. 6.44 Effect of steel hardenability and size on the distortion of case-hardened washer-like test pieces made of En 353 steel. Dimensional ratio for both test pieces is ~3:2:1. Source: Ref 57 More
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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 7 Torsional fracture of a 1½-inch-diameter case-hardened steel shaft, illustrating cracking of the hard, brittle case and transverse shear fracture at the right end across the relatively soft, ductile core. Hot etched to reveal twisting and distortion of the originally straight grain flow More
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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 8 Compression test of two steel cubes deep case hardened only on the top and bottom surfaces. A compressive force perpendicular to the case-hardened surfaces caused cracking (arrows) in the very hard (66 HRC) cases on both surfaces. The soft, ductile cores simply bulged under More
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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 4 Sketch of a fractured case-hardened shaft showing chevron marks pointing back toward the fracture origin. If brittle fracture continues completely around the part, the two separate fractures may form a step where they meet opposite the origin. The interior, or core, is likely to have More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 5 Case hardenabilities of a number of carburizing steels with oil quenching More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 18 Residual-stress distribution and retained austenite content in case-hardened steels More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 22 Sketch of a fractured case-hardened shaft showing chevron marks pointing back toward the fracture origin. If brittle fracture continues completely around the part, the two separate fractures may form a step where they meet opposite the origin. The interior, or core, is likely to have More
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Published: 01 December 1999
Fig. 5.13 Effect of grain size on the fatigue strength of case-hardened test pieces. Source: Ref 22 More
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Published: 01 December 1999
Fig. 5.15 Effect of grain size on fatigue strength of case-hardened gears with and without removal of a 0.08 mm surface layer. Coarse-grained steel, ASTM 1-4; fine-grained steel, ASTM 6-8. Source: Ref 24 More
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Published: 01 December 1999
Fig. 6.4 Continuous-cooling transformation diagrams for selected 3%Ni-Cr case-hardening steels. Specification En 36 is now replaced by 655M13 and 831M13. (a) Ni, Cr, and Mo contents all at the bottom of the specification range (En 36). Composition: 0.12 C, 0.20 Si, 0.40 Mn, 3.00 Ni, 0.60 Cr More
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Published: 01 December 1999
Fig. 6.16 Core properties and fatigue strength of case-hardened steels. (a) Effect of core hardness and case depth on the fatigue strength of a 1.4%Cr-3.5%Ni steel in which core carbon was varied from 0.09 to 0.42%. Arrow indicates maximum fatigue strength for Cr-Ni steels with 0.13 mm case More
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Published: 01 December 1999
Fig. 6.21 Case hardenabilities of a number of carburizing steels with oil quenching. Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 01 December 1999
Fig. 8.28 Plastic deformation produced at the (a) case-hardened surface and (b) non-case-hardened surface of shot-peened steels. Both 270× More
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Published: 01 December 1999
Fig. 1.22 Rotating beam fatigue strength of case-hardened 12 mm diam specimens, notched and unnotched. The line for carburized gears shown in Fig. 1.23 is superimposed (converted to rotating bending fatigue). Source: Ref 33 More