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case depth

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Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1999
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cmp.t66770135
EISBN: 978-1-62708-337-9
... on core properties including hardenability, microstructure, tensile and yield strength, ductility, toughness, and fatigue resistance. It likewise explains how carbon affects case hardenability, surface hardness, and case toughness and how case depth influences residual stresses and bending and contact...
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Published: 01 June 1985
Fig. 4-40. Case crushing depends on stress applied, radius of curvature, case depth, and core hardness. More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 12.20 (Part 1) Case carburizing: estimation of case depth by microscopical methods. 0.15% C (0.17C-0.05Si-0.64Mn, wt%). The structure of this carburized case in the normalized condition is shown in Fig. 12.15 (Part 1) (d) and (h) . The parenthetical carbon contents are those More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 12.20 (Part 2) Case carburizing: estimation of case depth by microscopical methods. 0.15% C (0.17C-0.05Si-0.64Mn, wt%). The structure of this carburized case in the normalized condition is shown in Fig. 12.15 (Part 1) (d) and (h) . The parenthetical carbon contents are those More
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Published: 01 December 2000
Fig. 5.26 Case depth profile vs. tooth pressure angle. Dashed line indicates case depth profile. More
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Published: 01 September 2005
Fig. 28 Case depth profile vs. tooth pressure angle. Dashed line indicates case depth profile More
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Published: 01 June 1985
Fig. 3-1. Spiral bevel gear, 2.5 D.P. SAE 4820H, case depth 0.068 in., 58 HRC. Operation: coal mining. Every tooth crushed and subsequently broken at toe end, midprofile, convex (loaded) side. More
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Published: 01 June 1985
Fig. 4-25. Applied stress vs case depth (net strength). More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 21.8 Torsional strength as a function of case depth for various grades of steel. Source: Ref 21.16 More
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Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 21.2 Effect of time on case depth during pack carburizing at 925 °C (1700 °F). Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 21.3 Effect of time and temperature on case depth during gas carburizing. Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 9.41 Categorization of diffusion processes by typical case depth More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 5.15 Longitudinal residual surface compressive stresses versus case depth in four induction-hardened steels. Source: Ref 5.6 (Copyright 1963, Society for Experimental Mechanics) More
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Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. 2 Case depth as a function of carburizing time for normal carburizing (no diffusion cycle) of low-carbon and certain low-alloy steels. Curve A: Total case depth. Curve B: Effective case depth for surface carbon content of 1.1% to saturation. Curve C: Effective case depth for surface More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 2 Effect of density on the case depth as measured through a hardness traverse from the surface. Courtesy of P. Beiss, University of Aachen, Germany More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 88 Macroscopic examination of case depth at cross section of crankshaft bearing. Source: Ref 67 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 1 Correlation of case depth of carbonitrided steels with varying diffusion times and temperatures More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 44 Dependence of the carbon gradient as a function of case depth for three carburized steels that were carburized under the same conditions: 925 °C and 10 h. 1, chromium-molybdenum steel (0.56% Cr, 0.16% Mo); 2, carbon steel; 3, nickel steel (3.5% Ni) More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 8 Total nitride case depth versus time in a fluidized bed at 525 °C (975 °F). Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 2 Influence of chromium on diffusion layer hardness and total case depth in various 0.40 to 0.45% C steels. Source: Ref 5 More