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carbon fiber

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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 8.8 Voids in a high-fiber-volume unidirectional carbon fiber composite part. (a) Sectioned and polished perpendicular to the fiber direction. Bright-field illumination, 10× objective. (b) Sectioned and polished parallel to the fiber direction. Bright-field illumination, 10× objective More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 15.15 Lightning strike damage in a carbon fiber composite material showing fiber and matrix vaporization and degradation as well as microcracking. Bright-field illumination, 25× objective More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 21.1 Relative material temperature limits. Carbon-carbon (C-C), carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP), ceramic matrix composite (CMC), carbon-silicon carbide (C-SiC), glass-ceramic matrix composite (GCMC), metal matrix composite (MMC), silicon-aluminum-oxygen-nitrogen (SIALON) More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 1.3 Unidirectional carbon fiber composite cross sections displaying carbon fiber types of similar strength and modulus but differing in fiber shape. (a) Cylindrical carbon fiber shape. Bright-field illumination, 50× objective. (b) Irregular bean-shaped fibers. Bright-field illumination More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 8.2 Laminate made with unidirectional carbon fiber prepreg and woven carbon fabric prepreg plies. Voids are shown in the woven fabric area at the bottom of the composite part that was against the tool surface during cure. Bright-field illumination, 65 mm macrophotograph More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 7 Fatigue striations in a carbon-fiber composite. 2000× More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 8 Fatigue striations in the resin beneath a carbon fiber that was pulled out of a carbon/epoxy (AS4/3501-6) laminate following mode I fatigue loading. 5000× More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 9 Fatigue striations in the resin of a carbon-fiber composite laminate that failed in mode I fatigue loading. Striations cover the surfaces of several fibers. 1000× More
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Published: 01 September 2011
Fig. 2.23 Filament winding a pressure vessel with carbon fiber More
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Published: 01 October 2012
Fig. 11.4 Relative material temperature limits. CFRP, carbon fiber-reinforced plastic; GMC, glass-matrix composite; MMC, metal-matrix composite; GCMC, glass-ceramic-matrix composite; CMC, ceramic-matrix composite; C-C, carbon-carbon; SiAlON, silicon-aluminum-oxynitride. Source: Ref 11.1 More
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Published: 01 October 2012
Fig. 11.17 Turbopump assembly showing the carbon-fiber-reinforced SiC blisk (right) and a metal inducer and impeller mounted on its shaft. The use of continuous fiber ceramic-matrix composites for this application increases the temperature capability up to 1370 °C (2500 °F). Source: Ref 11.3 More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 1.4 Crystallinity in thermoplastic-matrix carbon fiber composites. (a) Crystalline region in the center area of a woven carbon fabric composite cross section. Ultrathin section, transmitted polarized light with a full wave plate (540 nm), 20× objective. (b) Fiber-induced spherulite growth More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 1.6 Entrapped air in a composite part made from unidirectional carbon fiber prepreg and woven fabric prepreg. Voids (dark areas) are shown mainly in the interply regions of the cross section. Bright-field illumination, 65 mm macrophotograph montage More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 1.9 Thermoplastic stitch in carbon fiber composite material. Note the microcracks in the center of the stitch. Epi-fluorescence, 390–440 nm excitation, 25× objective More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 1.10 Multiphase thermosetting-matrix composites. (a) Carbon fiber composite cross section. Etched and viewed using reflected-light phase contrast, 25× objective. (b) Glass fiber composite ultrathin section. Transmitted light, 20× objective. (c) Carbon fiber composite cross section having More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 1.14 Cross section of a carbon fiber prepreg skin-film adhesive co-cured honeycomb composite showing two fillet regions. A few voids are shown in the adhesive areas. Bright-field illumination montage, 5× objective More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 2.3 Carbon fiber composite laminate labeled for sectioning using a silver ink felt-tip permanent marker. This sample with the corresponding section map was originally sent for nondestructive inspection. More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 2.4 Micrographs showing damage from cutting a carbon fiber composite part with an abrasive band saw. (a) A surfacing film can be observed on the surface of the carbon fiber composite. Polarized light, 25× objective. (b) Same view but using epi-fluorescence, 390–440 nm excitation, 25 More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 4.7 A carbon fiber composite with a titanium fastener is clamped in a fixture and aligned for sectioning. In this figure, the alignment is performed using a straight edge. This sample will be sectioned through the fastener, with the straight edge providing alignment of the edge of the saw More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 5.1 Carbon fiber composite/honeycomb chamfer area. Bright-field illumination, 5× objective. 4 × 5 in. 14-picture (Polaroid) micrograph montage More