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carbon content

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Published: 01 December 1999
Fig. 4.2 Influence of carbon content on retained austenite content. Source: Ref 2 More
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Published: 01 September 2005
Fig. 28 Effect of core carbon content and alloy content on impact fracture strength of a series of steels, carburized at 925 °C (1700 °F), cooled to 840 °C (1550 °F), oil quenched, and tempered at 150 °C (340 °F). Source: Ref 61 SAE (DIN) steel grade Composition, wt % C Mb Ni More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 43 Martensitic hardness as a function of carbon content in carbon and alloy steel. Source: Ref 80 More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 9.18 (Part 6) (l) Variation with carbon content of hardness of carbon steels that have been fully austenitized and quenched rapidly to room temperature. A band of values is shown for carbon contents exceeding about 0.8%. The upper limit of this band indicates the hardness obtained when More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 4.18 Volume percent retained austenite versus carbon content in plain carbon steels quenched to room temperature. Data points from several references establish the width of the scatter band More
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Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. 5 Effects of carbon content on the microstructures of plain-carbon steels. (a) Ferrite grains (white) and pearlite (gray streaks) in a white matrix of a hypoeutectoid steel containing 0.4% C. 1000×. (b) Microstructure (all pearlite grains) of a eutectoid steel containing 0.77% C. 2000 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 2.17 Effect of carbon content on the mechanical properties of plain carbon steels. Source: Ref 2.1 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 2.19 Effect of carbon content on the tensile strength and hardness of carbon steels. Source: Ref 2.1 More
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Published: 01 November 2013
Fig. 15 Effect of carbon content on tempering of plain carbon steels. Source: Ref 8 More
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Published: 31 December 2020
Fig. 10 Effect of carbon content in plain carbon steel on the hardness of fine pearlite formed when the quenching curve intersects the nose of the time-temperature diagram for isothermal transformation. Source: Ref 10 More
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 18-3 Hardness vs. carbon content of cast carbon steels ( 6 ) More
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 18-9 Tensile strength and reduction of area vs. carbon content of cast carbon steels ( 6 ) More
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 18-10 Yield strength and elongation vs. carbon content of cast carbon steels ( 6 ) More
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 18-11 Hardness vs. carbon content of cast carbon steels ( 6 ) More
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 18-13 Room-temperature Charpy V-notch values vs. carbon content of cast carbon steel in the normalized and tempered condition [tempering temperature 1200 °F (650 °C)] ( 6 ) More
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 27-8 The variation of thermal conductivity with carbon content of plain carbon steels at room temperature ( 14 ) More
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Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 11.20 Effect of carbon content on tempering of plain carbon steels. Source: Ref 5 More
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Published: 01 December 2001
Fig. 3 Effect of carbon content on the hardness of low-carbon white iron More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 10 Dependence of the martensitic structure on carbon content More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 23 Schematic illustration of carbon content, retained austenite, and residual stresses in the case of carburized steels More