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carbide precipitates

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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 10 Variation of carbide precipitation locus with time. Source: Ref 16 More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 11 Delay in carbide precipitation induced by nitrogen level. Source: Ref 17 More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 12.9 Schematic representation of cellular carbide precipitation at a grain boundary in a nickel-base superalloy More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 23.12 Chromium carbide precipitation on various types of boundaries in type 304 stainless steel. Arrows in upper left point to large carbides on a high-angle grain boundary, and IT and CT refer to incoherent and coherent twin boundaries, respectively. Transmission electron micrograph More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 23.13 M 23 C 6 carbide precipitation kinetics in type 304 stainless steel containing 0.05% C and originally quenched from 1250 °C (2282 °F). Source: Ref 23.14 More
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Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 5-41 Secondary hardening due to alloy carbide precipitation as produced by increasing additions of vanadium, molybdenum, tungsten, and chromium in 0.5% C steel. Source: Ref 79 More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 March 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.stg2.t61280025
EISBN: 978-1-62708-267-9
..., including their properties, behaviors, and microstructure. It examines the role of more than 20 alloying elements, including phosphorus (promotes carbide precipitation), boron (improves creep properties), lanthanum (increases hot corrosion resistance), and carbon and tungsten which serve as matrix...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 1999
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.lmcs.t66560283
EISBN: 978-1-62708-291-4
... contents below 0.2% is likely to be redistributed in this way. Above 0.2% C, the sites become saturated and the excess carbon is held in the defect-free regions of the martensite crystals. Carbide Precipitation . A discrete carbide phase in the form of extremely small (~2 nm diameter) uniformly...
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 9.23 Schematic representation of the two most common bainite morphologies. (a) Upper bainite and (b) lower bainite. The dark particles represent cementite, and the white regions represent ferrite. Simplified growth schemes are indicated for upper bainite (c) with carbide precipitation More
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Published: 01 December 2001
Fig. 10 Time-temperature-sensitization curves for type 304 stainless steel in a mixture of CuSO4 and H2SO4 containing free copper. Curves show the times required for carbide precipitation in steels with various carbon contents. Carbides precipitate in the areas to the right of the various More
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Published: 31 December 2020
Fig. 8 Time-temperature-sensitization curves for type 304 stainless steel in a mixture of CuSO 4 and H 2 SO 4 containing free copper. Curves show the times required for carbide precipitation in steels with various carbon contents. Carbides precipitate in the areas to the right of the various More
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Published: 01 June 2007
Fig. 5.35 Microstructures of type 316L stainless steel sintered in hydrogen at 1150 °C (2100 °F) (glyceregia). (a) Carbon is 0.015%; thin and clean grain boundaries. (b) Carbon is 0.07%; necklace-type chromium-rich carbide precipitates in grain boundaries. (c) Carbon is 0.11%; continuous More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 13.24 (a) “Conventional” bainite formed in continuous cooling. Parallel plates, forming “packets.” Precipitated carbides can be observed. (b) and (c) Bainitic ferrite: parallel plates, without the presence of carbides. Between the plates, there is usually retained austenite. (d) Auto More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 35 Example of die failure in a hot forging die caused by coarse grain size and strong precipitation of proeutectoid carbides on austenite grain boundaries. (a) Aspect of the tool. (b) and (c) Microstructure showing the coarse grain size (approximately ASTM 4; expecte d ASTM 8 to 10 More
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Published: 30 April 2020
Fig. 8.6 Microstructure of TiC in a tool steel matrix. The composite is formed by liquid-phase sintering mixed powders. The liquid phase is light, the dark phase is a carbide precipitate, and the connected structure is titanium carbide. More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. B.14 Wrought Hastelloy X solid-solution-hardened nickel-base superalloy microstructure; carbide precipitation has been influenced by deformation. Dislocations have formed around a primary M 6 C, and M 23 C 6 have precipitated on some of them. Thin-foil specimen. Original magnification More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 18.13 (a) Interlath retained austenite (white diagonal bands) and transition carbides in 4130 steel tempered at 150 °C (300 °F). (b) Dense transition carbide precipitation in a martensite lath in 4150 steel tempered at 150 °C. Dark-field transmission electron micrographs. Courtesy More
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Published: 01 August 2018
) with a starting microstructure of tempered martensite, acicular ferrite, and carbides (cementite). The prior austenitic grain boundaries are clearly visible after etching. There is some carbide precipitation in these boundaries. The final microstructure after long heat treatments is composed of ferrite More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 9 Depletion of chromium from the austenite near grain boundaries due to chromium carbide precipitation. Source: Ref 14 More
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Published: 01 June 2007
Fig. 31 Photomicrograph of as-sintered 316L part, showing continuous network of chromium carbide precipitates along the grain boundaries. Glyceregia etch More