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brazed stainless steel joints

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Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 April 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.imub.t53720411
EISBN: 978-1-62708-305-8
... metals and the types of flaws exhibited by brazed joints. brazed joints brazing filler metals eddy current inspection liquid penetrant inspection magnetic particle inspection nondestructive inspection radiographic inspection ultrasonic inspection visual inspection welding weldments...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ffub.t53610263
EISBN: 978-1-62708-303-4
... Abstract This chapter discusses the fatigue behavior of bolted, riveted, and welded joints. It describes the relative strength of machined and rolled threads and the effect of thread design, preload, and clamping force on the fatigue strength of bolts made from different steels. It explains...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.jub.t53290165
EISBN: 978-1-62708-306-5
... Abstract Brazing and soldering processes use a molten filler metal to wet the mating surfaces of a joint, with or without the aid of a fluxing agent, leading to the formation of a metallurgical bond between the filler and the respective components. This chapter discusses the characteristics...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 March 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.stg2.t61280149
EISBN: 978-1-62708-267-9
... process. Shielding gases or vacuum are used to protect bonds in most γ′ -hardened superalloys. The highest-strength joints are produced by true metallurgical bonds created by fusion or solid-state welding. However, use of brazing, which does not produce melting of the base metals being joined, is a...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cw.t51820077
EISBN: 978-1-62708-339-3
... (b) 0.0085 (b) 18 (b) 2 (b) 0.4 (b) ... ... (a) Single values are maximum values unless otherwise stated. (b) Typical value The ferritic stainless steels are generally less weldable than the austenitic stainless steel and produce welded joints having lower...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cw.t51820099
EISBN: 978-1-62708-339-3
... electrode 0.016 0.94 0.78 0.015 0.011 23.0 10.5 3.13 ... 0.11 Portions of this chapter were adapted from: D.N. Noble, Selection of Wrought Duplex Stainless Steels , Welding, Brazing, and Soldering , Vol 6, ASM Handbook , ASM International, 1993, p 471–481 K. F. Krysiak...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cw.t51820043
EISBN: 978-1-62708-339-3
... cracking Microbiologically influenced corrosion Each phenomena and its effect on service integrity is discussed below. This chapter was adapted from: J.A. Brooks and J.C. Lippold, Selection of Wrought Austenitic Stainless Steels , Welding, Brazing, and Soldering , Vol 6...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.jub.t53290099
EISBN: 978-1-62708-306-5
... transformations of the main classes of metals and alloys during fusion welding. The main classes include work- or strain-hardened metals and alloys, precipitation-hardened alloys, transformation-hardened steels and cast irons, stainless steels, and solid-solution and dispersion-hardened alloys. The following...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2007
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.pmsspmp.t52000167
EISBN: 978-1-62708-312-6
... gap must be designed to take into consideration the thermal expansion behavior of the mating parts. The optimal joint gap for PM stainless steel brazing is typically 0.10 to 0.15 mm (0.004 to 0.006 in.). Gap selection is critical, because it determines capillary forces, which in turn govern joint fill...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cw.t51820169
EISBN: 978-1-62708-339-3
... used to assist welding stainless steel to carbon or low-alloy steel. (a) Edge prepared for buttering. (b) Face buttered with filler metal. (c) Buttered face prepared for welding. (d) Joint aligned for welding. (e) Joint welded with stainless steel filler metal. Source: Ref 1 Most metals and...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.jub.t53290279
EISBN: 978-1-62708-306-5
..., martensite. See text for details. Source: Ref 10.1 If dilution of austenitic stainless steel filler metal is a problem, it may be controlled by first buttering the joint face of the carbon or low-alloy steel with one or two layers of type 309 or 310 stainless steel filler metal, as shown in Fig...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 July 2009
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.bcp.t52230401
EISBN: 978-1-62708-298-3
... Abstract Beryllium has been successfully joined by fusion welding, brazing, solid-state bonding, and soldering. This chapter describes these processes in detail along with their advantages and disadvantages. It also addresses application considerations such as surface preparation, joint design...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 1999
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.lmcs.t66560309
EISBN: 978-1-62708-291-4
... that of the steel but above 450 °C, [1] the molten alloy is made to wet the surfaces of the workpieces and allowed to solidify so as to fill the gap between them. Brazing and braze welding processes differ. In brazing, the filler metal is distributed between closely fitting surfaces of the joint...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ssde.t52310201
EISBN: 978-1-62708-286-0
... ( Chapter 13 ) of this book. Brazes and solders rarely match the corrosion resistance of stainless steels, and careful attention should be given to the potential for galvanic and other forms of corrosion when considering the use of soldered or brazed joints with stainless steels. Safety must always be...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cw.t51820013
EISBN: 978-1-62708-339-3
.... et al. , Evaluation of Weld-Zone Corrosion of Shipbuilding Steel Plates for Use in the Arctic Environment , Can. Metall. Q. , Vol 27 ( No. 4 ), 1988 , p 311 – 321 10.1179/cmq.1988.27.4.311 17. Taira T. et al. , “Sulfide Corrosion Cracking of Girth-Welded Joint of Line Pipe for...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.jub.t53290001
EISBN: 978-1-62708-306-5
... Pressure Vessel Code, Section IX: Welding and Brazing Qualifications, and ANSI/AWS D1.1 Structural Welding Code Steel provide flexibility to a welding manufacturer (fabricator) to select or change weld joint design for fabrication, but they require the manufacturer to qualify the welding procedure to meet...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2007
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.htcma.t52080423
EISBN: 978-1-62708-304-1
... Joints , Corrosion , Vol 13 , 9th ed. , Metals Handbook , ASM International , 1987 , p 876 42. Heiple C. , Bennett W. , and Rising T. , Embrittlement of Several Stainless Steels by Liquid Copper and Liquid Braze Alloys , Mater. Sci. Eng. , Vol 52 , 1982 , p 177 10.1016...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.tpmpa.t54480265
EISBN: 978-1-62708-318-8
... require joining titanium to stainless steel. Several silver-base alloys and the experimental palladium-base alloy are used for such joints. Major defects in brazed joints are unbrazed areas, poor fillet geometry, excessive penetration, and embrittlement of the base metals. Effective quality control is...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.jub.t53290137
EISBN: 978-1-62708-306-5
.... Fig. 6.23 Bond zone pattern typical of explosion clad metals. Materials are type 304L stainless steel and medium-carbon steel. 20×. Source: Ref 6.1 Explosion welding is suitable for joining metals of the same type, such as steel to steel, as well as metals with substantially different...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2000
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ttg2.t61120065
EISBN: 978-1-62708-269-3
... those required during the welding of austenitic stainless steel or aluminum alloys, must be taken to shield the weld and hot root side of the joint from air. EBW involves an evacuated chamber to permit electrons to be generated and delivered to the workpiece or it involves inert gas shielding of the...