1-20 of 198 Search Results for

brazed joints

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 1999
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.caaa.t67870161
EISBN: 978-1-62708-299-0
... Abstract This chapter describes the factors that affect the corrosion performance of aluminum assemblies joined by methods such as welding, brazing, soldering, and adhesive bonding. The factors covered include galvanic effects, crevices, and assembly stresses in products susceptible to stress...
Image
Published: 01 July 2009
Fig. 23.20 Effect of brazing temperature and time on strength and braze joint microstructure of beryllium sheet brazed with BAg-18 alloy. (Microstructures reproduced at approximately 50 wt%). Source: Grant 1979 More
Image
Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 7.9 Diffusion process resulting in loss of identity of original brazed joint. Source: Ref 7.9 More
Image
Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 33 Representative view of the brazed joint between the reamer body (bottom) and reamer shaft (top). Microstructure is tempered martensite. Etched with 2% nital. Original magnification: 100× More
Image
Published: 01 April 2013
Fig. 19 Incomplete penetration of filler metal (BAg-1) in a brazed joint between copper components. 20×. Source: Ref 1 More
Image
Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 1.9 Design of a brazed joint to redistribute stress. Source: Ref 1.1 More
Image
Published: 01 June 1988
Fig. 6.30 Basic brazing joints: lap, butt, and scarf. From J. Davies and P. Simpson, Induction Heating Handbook , McGraw-Hill, Ltd., London, 1979 ( Ref 13 ) More
Image
Published: 01 June 1988
Fig. 6.31 Modified brazing joints. From J. Davies and P. Simpson, Induction Heating Handbook , McGraw-Hill, Ltd., London, 1979 ( Ref 13 ) More
Image
Published: 01 June 1988
Fig. 6.32 Brazed joint designs intended to lessen stress concentrations and fatigue failures. From J. Davies and P. Simpson, Induction Heating Handbook , McGraw-Hill, Ltd., London, 1979 ( Ref 13 ) More
Image
Published: 30 June 2023
Fig. 10.25 Tube and fin brazed joint More
Image
Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 3.13 Tensile strength of copper-to-copper joints brazed with amorphous Cu-7P- x Ni- y Sn-7P-0.2RE braze by flame heating. The respective values of x and y are given alongside the bars on the chart. Maximum strength is achieved with 4% nickel and 6% tin. More
Image
Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 4.21 Impact test on brazed T-joints, clearly demonstrating the role of fillets in enhancing joint strength. Substrate: mild steel. Braze: Ag-Cu-Cd-Zn More
Image
Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 11.2 Brazed and braze-welded joints. (a) 0.10% C (0.09C-0.005SI-0.41 Mn, wt%). Brazed using a gas torch and silver solder (49.6Ag-15.0Cu-18.1 Zn-17.3Cd) as a filler metal. Nital. 250×. (b) 0.1% C (0.09C-0.005Si-0.43Mn, wt%). Furnace brazed using copper filler metal. Nital. 250×. (c More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 April 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.imub.t53720411
EISBN: 978-1-62708-305-8
... metals and the types of flaws exhibited by brazed joints. brazed joints brazing filler metals eddy current inspection liquid penetrant inspection magnetic particle inspection nondestructive inspection radiographic inspection ultrasonic inspection visual inspection welding weldments...
Image
Published: 01 June 1988
Fig. 6.29 Influence of joint thickness on theoretical strength of soldered and brazed joints. From F. W. Curtis, High Frequency Induction Heating , McGraw-Hill, New York, 1950 ( Ref 3 ) More
Image
Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 7.7 Typical coil and joint configurations used in induction brazing: (a) solenoid coil for plug-to-tube joint (note location of brazing alloy ring), (b) internal-external coil for flange-to-tube joint (flange chamfered to assist preplaced alloy ring), (c) split solenoid coil for tube More
Image
Published: 01 August 2005
psi), with a niobium foil pressed between them. Note that joint strength is largely maintained up to 900 °C (1650 °F), which is about 400 °C (750 °F) higher than would be expected for an active copper-base brazed joint. (b) Schematic illustration of the interlayer structure used to produce the active More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.pb.t51230143
EISBN: 978-1-62708-351-5
... … … … … … … 353,000 10,000 2,470 70.0 M6 … … … … … … … 1,000,000 28,300 6,180 175 M6.5 100,000 … … … … … … 3,530,000 100,000 24,700 700 M7 … … … … … … … 10,000,000 283,000 61,800 1750 Recommended joint clearances, at the brazing temperature, for common brazes used...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.jub.t53290165
EISBN: 978-1-62708-306-5
... Abstract Brazing and soldering processes use a molten filler metal to wet the mating surfaces of a joint, with or without the aid of a fluxing agent, leading to the formation of a metallurgical bond between the filler and the respective components. This chapter discusses the characteristics...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.pb.t51230001
EISBN: 978-1-62708-351-5
... and spreading by the braze, despite widening of the melting range of the filler metal. Note: 316L stainless steel is sensitive to liquid metal embrittlement by copper-base brazing alloys. Adapted from Keller et al. [1990] Fig. 1.17 Effect of contact angle on fillet formation and joint filling. Low...