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braze

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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 11.2 Brazed and braze-welded joints. (a) 0.10% C (0.09C-0.005SI-0.41 Mn, wt%). Brazed using a gas torch and silver solder (49.6Ag-15.0Cu-18.1 Zn-17.3Cd) as a filler metal. Nital. 250×. (b) 0.1% C (0.09C-0.005Si-0.43Mn, wt%). Furnace brazed using copper filler metal. Nital. 250×. (c More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 1.3 Principal braze alloy families and their melting ranges More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 1.19 Spread area of 0.5 mg spheres silver-copper eutectic braze on a nickel substrate in a nitrogen-10% hydrogen atmosphere as a function of holding time at 820 °C (1500 °F). Four distinct stages are observed, demonstrating the complexity of the wetting process. [ Weirauch, Jr More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 1.28 Aluminum components brazed using a preform of (left) braze and (right) one component roll-clad with brazing alloy. In both cases, the brazing process was fluxless. Because roll-clad braze is generally thinner than a perform, the upper component needs to be smaller in area to achieve More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 2.25 Thermomechanical working behavior of the Al-20Cu-5Si-2Ni braze, which shows it has favorable characteristics for hot working if heated to between 250 and 370 °C (480 and 700 °F) More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 2.27 Micrograph of a joint made using Al-12Si braze between components that have been metallized with copper. The joint microstructure comprises silicon in a matrix of the intermetallic compound Al 2 Cu. 420× More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 3.17 Schematic cross section of a tube-to-plate joint designed such that braze flow will sweep gas and flux out of the joint gap. Formation of an external fillet provides evidence that some braze spreading and wetting has taken place. This design of joint also protects the braze preform More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 4.1 Metallographic cross section through a 100 μm (4 mils) tri-foil braze preform. It consists of thin foils of a copper-nickel alloy applied by roll cladding to a core of aluminum-silicon alloy. The ratio of the thickness of the foils is adjusted to provide the correct aggregate More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 4.30 Schematic illustration used to assess the ability of a braze to form void-free joints as a function of the joint thickness at constant joint width More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 7.1 Effect of heating cycle time on the contact angles of four braze/nonmetal combinations: Al/SiC, Al/Si 3 N 4 , Cu-Ti/Al 2 O 3 , and Ag-Cu-Ti/Si 3 N 4 . The time required to establish a low-contact angle is more than an order of magnitude slower than for braze/metal combinations. More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 7.34 Yield stress of silver-copper-indium braze, measured on bulk samples as a function of temperature. The braze melting range is 625 °C (1160 °F) to 755 °C (1390 °F). More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 7.35 Strength of copper-alumina joints made using the Cu/CuO 2 eutectic braze as a function of the thickness of the AlCuO 2 interfacial reaction layer formed. Adapted from Kim and Kim [1992] More
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Published: 01 July 2009
Fig. 23.18 Shear stress as a function of braze thickness for a zinc-brazed beryllium joint showing the specimen load configuration. Source: Marschall 1990 More
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Published: 01 July 2009
Fig. 23.20 Effect of brazing temperature and time on strength and braze joint microstructure of beryllium sheet brazed with BAg-18 alloy. (Microstructures reproduced at approximately 50 wt%). Source: Grant 1979 More
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Published: 01 April 2004
Fig. 1.4 Principal braze alloy families and their melting ranges More
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Published: 01 April 2004
Fig. 5.29 Finite-element analysis prediction of the geometry of a ceramic-metal brazed joint, at its periphery, at the solidus temperature of the filler alloy and on cooling to room temperature More
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Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 7.1 Extensive flow capability of braze filler metal: (a) filler metal wire is placed around outer surface; (b) after brazing, filler metal has melted and flowed to close and seal all gaps. Source: Ref 7.1 More
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Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 7.4 Principal braze alloy families and their melting ranges. Source: Ref 7.4 , p 7 More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.pb.9781627083515
EISBN: 978-1-62708-351-5
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.jub.t53290165
EISBN: 978-1-62708-306-5
... Abstract Brazing and soldering processes use a molten filler metal to wet the mating surfaces of a joint, with or without the aid of a fluxing agent, leading to the formation of a metallurgical bond between the filler and the respective components. This chapter discusses the characteristics...