1-20 of 87 Search Results for

axle shafts

Sort by
Image
Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 24 Large axle shaft of medium-carbon steel with fatigue fracture across most of the cross section before final rupture. Note the smooth origin region (arrow) and gradually coarsening fracture surface as the fatigue crack progressed. Note that there was a thread groove running around More
Image
Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 34 Torsional fatigue fracture of a 1050 steel axle shaft induction-hardened to about 50 HRC. The arrow indicates the longitudinal shear fatigue origin, which then changed direction and grew to the small circular beach mark, or “halo.” Final brittle fracture (note chevron marks in the case More
Image
Published: 01 August 2015
Fig. 9.8 Quench cracks in axle shaft flange radius. Source: Ref 4 More
Image
Published: 01 August 2015
Fig. 9.10 Quench crack at spline end of axle shaft. Source: Ref 4 More
Image
Published: 01 February 2005
Fig. 18.2 Automotive axle shaft with chevrons [ Hannan et al., 2000 ] More
Image
Published: 01 June 1985
Fig. 6-1. Failure of this axle shaft resulted from torsional fatigue in the tensile plane, originating from one of several gouge marks observed around the shaft at the splined radius. The fatigue crack progressed for a large number of cycles before final fracture. More
Image
Published: 01 December 2009
Fig. 12.3 Brittle fracture of a modified SAE 1050 (0.50% C, 0.95% Mn, 0.25% Si, 0.01% S, and 0.01% P) axle shaft due to single-bending impact load in a lab test. The hot rolled and upset shaft had an induction-hardened case (60 HRC) with a softer core (20 HRC). Failure occurred at the flange More
Image
Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 21 Effect of case depth on fatigue life. Fatigue tests on induction-hardened 1038 steel automobile axle shafts 32 mm (1.25 in.) in diameter. Case depth ranges given on the chart are depths to 40 HRC. Shafts with lower fatigue life had a total case depth to 20 HRC of 4.5 to 5.2 mm (0.176 More
Image
Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 93 Bending fatigue response of furnace-hardened and induction-hardened medium-carbon steel tractor axles. Shaft diameter: 70 mm. Fillet radius: 1.6 mm. Source: Ref 45 More
Image
Published: 01 August 2015
Fig. 10.2 Bending fatigue response of furnace-hardened and induction-hardened medium-carbon steel tractor axles. Shaft diameter: 70 mm (2.75 in.). Fillet radius: 1.6 mm (0.063 in.) Source: Ref 2 More
Image
Published: 01 June 1988
Fig. 6.15 Bending-fatigue response of furnace hardened and induction hardened medium-carbon steel tractor axles: shaft diameter, 7.0 cm (2.75 in.); fillet radius, 0.16 cm (0.063 in.). From T. H. Spencer, et al., Induction Hardening and Tempering , ASM, Metals Park, OH, 1964 ( Ref 7 ) More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.piht2.t55050191
EISBN: 978-1-62708-311-9
... to large case depths and heat treating entire cross sections. Induction is commonly applied to several types of parts. Typical parts that are induction surface hardened include: Transportation field: crankshafts, camshafts, axle shafts, transmission shafts, splined shafts, universal joints...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 1985
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.sagf.t63420185
EISBN: 978-1-62708-452-9
... of available examinations cannot be detailed here, a chosen few will be presented for the purpose of showing how a systematic approach to failure examination actually works. Broken Shaft One end of a broken axle shaft was returned to the manufacturer and subsequently submitted for analysis. Background...
Image
Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 5 Surface of a torsional fatigue crack that caused brittle fracture of the case of an induction-hardened axle of 1541 steel. The fatigue crack originated (arrow) at a fillet (with a radius smaller than specified) at a change in shaft diameter near a keyway runout. Case hardness was about More
Image
Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 23 Surface of a torsional fatigue fracture that caused brittle fracture of the case of an induction-hardened axle of 1541 steel. The fatigue crack originated (arrow) at a fillet (with a radius smaller than specified) at a change in shaft diameter near a keyway runout. Case hardness More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.piht2.t55050175
EISBN: 978-1-62708-311-9
... photomicrographs of several types of quench cracks. Unless the quench cracks are extremely tight, they may be visible as the workpiece is polished, before etching. Fig. 9.8 Quench cracks in axle shaft flange radius. Source: Ref 4 Fig. 9.9 Quench crack in induction-hardened shoulder. Source: Ref...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 1985
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.sagf.t63420027
EISBN: 978-1-62708-452-9
... of drive shaft, differential, reduction gears, and axle shafts. The second truck had electric motor-driven wheels that drove through a planetary gear set. The criterion for settling the argument? Nose both loaded trucks against the vertical wall of the pit and gun the engine. Whichever truck stalled...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 April 2024
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.phtpp.t59380085
EISBN: 978-1-62708-456-7
... hardening setup for shaft hardening. Fig. 5.20 Typical setups for austenitizing and quenching in (a) single-shot and (b) scanning induction-hardening processes. Note that round parts are usually rotated during heat treatment in order to enhance temperature uniformity. Source: Ref 5 Fig...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 February 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.chffa.t51040141
EISBN: 978-1-62708-300-3
..., the shape of the die segments on the forging rolls determines the rolled configuration. An example illustrating the application of preforming by roll forging, or reducer rolling, is shown in Fig. 12.3 . Another example, illustrating preforming for a truck axle forging, is seen in Fig. 12.4 . Fig...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 November 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.uhcf3.t53630117
EISBN: 978-1-62708-270-9
... of damage also may occur when opposite sides of the fatigue fracture rub against each other during compression or shear loading of a crack. For example, a shaft in rotating bending has a tensile stress at one position (convex side) of the rotating member, while on the opposite (concave) side the compressive...