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axle

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Published: 01 January 2022
Fig. 12.12 Axle housing with integral axle tubes. Source: Ref 6 More
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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 24 Large axle shaft of medium-carbon steel with fatigue fracture across most of the cross section before final rupture. Note the smooth origin region (arrow) and gradually coarsening fracture surface as the fatigue crack progressed. Note that there was a thread groove running around More
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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 25 (a) Fracture surface of a 3.6-in.-diam axle housing tube showing four major fatigue-fracture origins (arrows) at the bottom. (b) Origin areas at higher magnification. Beach marks are clearly seen. Small areas of postfracture damage are present, but in general, the fracture More
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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 34 Torsional fatigue fracture of a 1050 steel axle shaft induction-hardened to about 50 HRC. The arrow indicates the longitudinal shear fatigue origin, which then changed direction and grew to the small circular beach mark, or “halo.” Final brittle fracture (note chevron marks in the case More
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Published: 30 April 2021
Fig. 11.23 Model showing how walking is rolling. The knee joint is the axle of the wheel, the foot is part of the rim of a wheel, and the lower leg is a spoke on a wheel. More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 2.3 Die cast alloy 380.0 rear axle housing More
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Published: 01 August 2015
Fig. 9.8 Quench cracks in axle shaft flange radius. Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 01 August 2015
Fig. 9.10 Quench crack at spline end of axle shaft. Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 01 June 2016
Fig. 9.18 B-1 nose landing gear false axle showing the wear damage that occurs during operation. Courtesy of South Dakota School of Mines and Technology More
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Published: 01 June 2016
Fig. 9.19 High-pressure cold-spray-repaired false axle showing both as-deposited and machined state. Courtesy of South Dakota School of Mines and Technology More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 33 As-received nose landing gear piston assembly and the failed axle More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 35 Fracture surface of the failed axle. (a) Black arrows show locations for SEM examination. (b) White arrows show fracture direction and location of metallographic sections. More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 36 Axle wall thickness, discolored region dimensions, and fracture location More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 56 As-received failed axle More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 57 Macrograph of fracture surface of the failed axle. Typical fracture origins are shown at arrows. More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 15.24 Fatigue failure in a forged railway axle. The wheel is still mounted in the axle. The fracture started at the radius transition corresponding to the area of the axis where the wheel is assembled. The arrow indicates the initiation. Beach marks indicate that the crack propagated More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 15.26 Region of the axle close to the point where the fatigue crack started, shown in the macrograph of Fig. 15.25 . Weld deposited metal (upper region of the image), heat affected zone in base metal similar to AISI 1050 (lower region of the image). Metallography by I. C. Abud, INT More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 18.1 The region where the fatigue fracture of the axle presented in Fig. 15.24 (Chapter 15, “Engineered Special Bar Quality Steel (Engineered Steels),” in this book) started. (a) The radial aspect of the marks inside the defect that started the fatigue failure. (b) A view of the region More
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Published: 01 February 2005
Fig. 12.4 Deformation stages in reducer rolling of a forging to produce a truck axle. (a) Starting billet. (b)–(e) Several reducer roll passes. (1)–(3) Locations where more material needed in the final forging. [ Haller, 1982 ] More
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Published: 01 February 2005
Fig. 18.2 Automotive axle shaft with chevrons [ Hannan et al., 2000 ] More