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autoclaves

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Published: 01 October 2012
Fig. 8.38 Principle of autoclave curing. The autoclave vessel is pressurized with gas, usually nitrogen or carbon dioxide, at some pressure (e.g., 690 kPa, or 100 psi). Because the laminate inside the vacuum bag is either at atmospheric pressure or has an applied vacuum, there exists More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 4.8 Tools used for autoclave heat-up tests. NC, numerical control. Source: Ref 5 More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 4.9 First autoclave heat-up rate test. NC, numerical control. Source: Ref 5 More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 4.10 Second autoclave heat-up rate test. NC, numerical control. Source: Ref 5 More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 4.11 Third autoclave heat-up rate test. NC, numerical control. Source: Ref 5 More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 5.13 Principle of autoclave curing More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 5.14 Typical production autoclave More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 5.15 Typical autoclave cure cycle. RT, room temperature More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 7.9 Gas flow velocity turbulence near autoclave door More
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.scm.t52870101
EISBN: 978-1-62708-314-0
... Abstract This chapter discusses the tooling used for autoclave curing, one of the most common composite fabrication processes. The discussion covers curing practices, material selection factors, and design challenges associated with thermal expansion, tool shrinkage, part complexity...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.scm.t52870201
EISBN: 978-1-62708-314-0
... heat and the reaction is exothermic. The concern when curing a composite laminate in an autoclave is that the heat-up rate can be too fast, resulting in a significant rise in temperature in a thick laminate, as shown in Fig. 7.6 . This could result in degradation of the laminate by overheating...
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Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 43 A JEDEC tray pattern is outlined by residue that accumulated during autoclave testing and observable optically when the part is tilted at an angle (A). The pattern affects the TT-SAM image (B). After removing accumulated residue with an eraser, the TT-SAM image in (C) is obtained. More
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Published: 01 December 2006
Fig. 4 Metallographic cross sections of the corroded surface of weld deposits on alloy B-2 (UNS N10665) after testing in an autoclave at 150 °C (300 °F) for 96 h in a 20% HCl environment. (a) Ni-28Mo (UNS N10665) alloy filler metal. 375× (b) Ni-42Mo filler metal. 375×. Both samples were etched More
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Published: 01 July 1997
Fig. 4 Metallographic cross sections of the corroded surface of weld deposits on Hastelloy B-2 (UNS N10665) after testing in an autoclave at 150 °C (300 °F) for 96 h in a 20% HCI environment. (a) Ni-28Mo (UNS N10665) alloy filler metal. 375x. (b) Ni-42Mo filler metal. 375x. Both samples were More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.scm.t52870119
EISBN: 978-1-62708-314-0
... processes are discussed: wet lay-up, prepreg lay-up, and low-temperature/vacuum bag curing prepreg. Wet lay-up is used extensively in commercial industries to fabricate fiberglass/polyester parts. Prepreg lay-up and autoclave curing is the predominant fabrication method used in the aerospace industry...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.scm.t52870183
EISBN: 978-1-62708-314-0
... ovens, heated platen presses, or autoclaves. Since time for chemical reactions is not requisite, the time required to reach consolidation temperature is a function of the heating method and the mass of the tooling. The consolidation temperature depends on the specific thermoplastic resin, but it should...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.scm.t52870517
EISBN: 978-1-62708-314-0
... made of prepreg, wet lay-ups, precured composites, or thin titanium sheets adhesively bonded together. Since field repairs are conducted with only vacuum bag pressure (≤14.7 psia or less), the quality of the repair is not as high as that of the original laminate, which was cured in an autoclave at 100...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.scm.t52870255
EISBN: 978-1-62708-314-0
... to 350 kPa) for honeycomb assemblies. The positive pressure of an autoclave, with a vented bag, usually gives quality superior to that of a bond produced in an oven under vacuum bag pressure. The amount of pressure and the adhesive selected are important in forming fillets at the core-to-skin bondlines...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 October 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.lmub.t53550385
EISBN: 978-1-62708-307-2
... strength, wet = 1 week immersion in 70 °C (160 °F) water. Source: Ref 8.1 To date, most high-performance carbon/epoxy structures have been fabricated using prepreg that is autoclave cured at either 121 or 177 °C (250 or 350 °F). In the early 1990s, work began in developing lower-temperature-curing...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.omfrc.t53030147
EISBN: 978-1-62708-349-2
... void contents. Voids may be located throughout the composite or near the bottom of the part, due to lower pressure near the tool surface ( Ref 6 , 14 , 15 ). Figure 8.2 shows an autoclave-cured composite part made with plies of woven carbon fabric prepreg and unidirectional carbon fiber prepreg...