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austenitic stainless steels

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Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ahsssta.t53700151
EISBN: 978-1-62708-279-2
... Abstract This chapter is a brief account of the composition, microstructures, heat treatment, deformation mechanisms, mechanical properties, formability, and special attributes of austenitic stainless steels. chemical composition microstructure heat treatment deformation mechanical...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ssde.t52310069
EISBN: 978-1-62708-286-0
... Abstract This chapter discusses the compositions, mechanical properties, phase structure, stabilization, corrosion resistance, and advantages of austenitic stainless steels. Austenitic alloys are classified and reviewed in three groups: (1) lean alloys, such as 201 and 301, which are generally...
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 11.9 Corrosion rates of austenitic stainless steels and ferritic steels as a function of metal temperature and flue gas temperatures. Source: Ref 11 More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 8.9 Strength vs. toughness trend line for austenitic stainless steels at 4 K. More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 11.3 Tensile and yield strengths of three austenitic stainless steels — AISI types 304, 310, and 316 — at temperatures between 4 K and 300 K ( Handbook on Materials for Superconducting Machinery , 1977 ). More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 11.4 Tensile and yield strengths of two austenitic stainless steels — AISI types 304 and 304L — at temperatures between 4 and 300 K ( Handbook on Materials for Superconducting Machinery , 1977 ). More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 11.5 Tensile and yield strengths of three austenitic stainless steels — AISI types 304, 321, and 347 — at temperatures between 4 and 300 K ( Handbook on Materials for Superconducting Machinery , 1977 ). More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 11.6 Notched tensile properties of five austenitic stainless steels — AISI types 304, 304L, 310, 310S, and 316 — at 4 K. K T is the stress concentration factor of the notch ( Handbook on Materials for Superconducting Machinery , 1977 ). More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 11.7 Fracture toughness of two austenitic stainless steels —AISI types 310 and 316 — at temperatures between 4 and 300 K ( LNG Materials and Fluids , 1978 ). More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 11.10 Tensile properties of two austenitic stainless steels — AISI types 304N (with 0.2% N) and 304 — at temperatures between 77 and 300 K ( Sanderson and Llewellyn, 1969 ). More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 11.16 Strain–cycling fatigue behavior of three austenitic stainless steels — AISI types 304 and 316 and a 21 Cr–6Ni–9Mn alloy — at 4 K ( Shepic and Schwartzberg, 1978 ). More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 11.21 Flexural fatigue ( R = −1) strength of two austenitic stainless steels — annealed AISI 347 and 60% cold-rolled AISI 301 — at room temperature and 77 K ( Favor, Gideon, Grover, Hayes, and McClure, 1961 ). More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 23.14 Stress-strain curves for types 304 and 301 austenitic stainless steels. Source: Ref 23.11 More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 1.10 Family relationships for standard austenitic stainless steels More
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Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 18.17 Relative stress-corrosion cracking behavior of austenitic stainless steels in boiling magnesium chloride. Source: Ref 9 More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 13.20 Metastable phase diagram for austenitic stainless steels quenched from temperatures near 1100 °C (2010 °F) (the temperature of the isothermal section in Fig. 13.18 ). Source: Ref 13.3 More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 16.16 Solidification sequences typical of austenitic stainless steels. Besides the primary phase forming from the liquid, the important morphological aspects of the as-cast product are also indicated. A = austenite, F = ferrite, Ac = acicular, N = lacy or network, Vm = vermicular More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 16.19 Typical structures of austenitic stainless steels that solidified in the FA mode. Vermicular ferrite and lacy (network) ferrite. Reproduced from Ref 11 and 15 . Courtesy of Nippon Steel Corporation. More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 12.4 Creep rate curves for several annealed H-grade austenitic stainless steels. (a) 1% creep in 100,000 h. (b) 1% creep in 10,000 h More
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Published: 01 June 2007
Fig. 2.9 Pressure-density curves of three austenitic stainless steels. Unpublished data More