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austenite

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Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.spsp2.t54410133
EISBN: 978-1-62708-265-5
... Austenite is the key to the versatility of steel and the controllable nature of its properties. It is the parent phase of pearlite, martensite, bainite, and ferrite. This chapter discusses the importance of austenite, beginning with the influence of austenitic grain size and how to accurately...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1999
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cmp.t66770077
EISBN: 978-1-62708-337-9
... Abstract This chapter addresses the issue of retained austenite in quenched carburized steels. It explains why retained austenite can be expected at the surface of case-hardened components, how to estimate the amount that will be present, and how to effectively stabilize or otherwise control...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 1999
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.lmcs.t66560221
EISBN: 978-1-62708-291-4
... Abstract This chapter discusses the isothermal transformation of austenite to pearlite, bainite, martensite, proeutectoid ferrite, and proeutectoid cementite. It describes the transformation mechanisms in eutectoid, hypoeutectoid, and hypereutectoid steels, the factors that influence nucleation...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 December 2020
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.phtbp.t59310055
EISBN: 978-1-62708-326-3
... Abstract The decomposition of austenite, during controlled cooling or quenching, produces a wide variety of microstructures in response to such factors as steel composition, temperature of transformation, and cooling rate. This chapter provides a detailed discussion on the isothermal...
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Published: 31 January 2024
Fig. A32 Phases present are austenite (γ) at 2.08 wt% carbon and liquid at 4.36 wt% carbon. Note: For irons, the dashed lines indicate the phase boundaries for iron in equilibrium with graphite. More
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Published: 01 December 2018
Fig. 3.10 Microstructures of steel, (a) ferrite; 100x; (b) austenite; 200x; and (c) pearlite; 1000x More
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Published: 01 December 2018
Fig. 3.13 Transformation of fcc austenite to bct martensite, known as the bain model More
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Published: 01 December 2018
Fig. 6.41 Microstructure of a tube comprising sigma phase in the worked austenite matrix at (a) OD surface, 200×; and (b) within the core of the tube, 400× More
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Published: 01 December 2018
Fig. 6.104 (a) Tube microstructure of worked austenite grains with twins and stain-induced martensite, 200×. (b) ID etched view having network of transgranuluar stress-corrosion cracks in the microstructure of slightly worked austenite grains with twins, 100× More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 3.11 Effect of chromium content on size of austenite phase field. Source: Ref 3.11 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 3.12 Effect of Mn on the size of the austenite phase field. Source: Ref 3.11 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 4.6 Calculated fraction austenite transformed to pearlite as a function of time for the parameters shown. Source: Ref 4.2 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 4.17 Proeutectoid cementite (white network) formed at austenite grain boundaries in an Fe-1.22C alloy held at 780 °C (1435 °F) for 30 min. Dark patches are pearlite colonies and the remainder of the microstructure is martensite and retained austenite. Nital etch. Original magnification More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 5.8 Retained austenite as a function of carbon content in Fe-C alloys. Source: Ref 5.10 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 5.11 (a) A body-centered tetragonal cell in austenite is identified by the <100>α axes. (b) The bct cell (left) before and (right) after the lattice deformation (Bain strain) from austenite to martensite. Source: Ref 5.40 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 5.19 Plate martensite and retained austenite (white patches) in (a) Fe-1.22C and (b) Fe-1.4C alloys. Light micrographs. Source: Ref 5.10 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 5.33 Interlath retained austenite, the thin linear features, in a steel containing 0.06 wt% carbon. Dark-field transmisson electron micrograph. Courtesy of Professor Steven Thompson, Colorado School of Mines More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 6.8 Retained austenite (gray, marked with A) between ferrite laths of upper bainite in 0.6% carbon steel containing 2.0% Si and transformed at 400 °C (750 °F). Transmission electron micrograph, original magnification 40,000×. Source: Ref 6.12 More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 3.38 Microstructure of segregation along a prior austenite grain boundary in the 0.7% C-3% Cr steel shown in Fig. 3.36 . 1000× More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 5.63 Micrographs of lamellar carbide colonies on an austenite grain boundary in cast 19% Cr-9% Ni heat-resistant HF steel. In (a) the light source is not centered, and in (b) the light source is centered. Note the improved sharpness of the carbide lamella in (b) (see arrows). Electrolytic More