1-20 of 900 Search Results for

atom

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2007
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.smnm.t52140063
EISBN: 978-1-62708-264-8
... Abstract Diffusion is the primary mechanism by which carbon atoms move or migrate in iron. It is driven by concentration gradients and aided by heat. This chapter provides a practical understanding of the diffusion process and its role in the production and treatment of steel. It discusses...
Image
Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 2.12 Point defects: A, interstitial atom; B, vacancy; C, foreign atom in lattice site More
Image
Published: 31 December 2020
Fig. 6 Point defects: A, interstitial atom; B, vacancy; C, foreign atom in lattice site More
Image
Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 2.6 Types of solid solution. An interstitial atom occupies a space between the atoms of the crystal lattice. Substitutional atoms replace or substitute for an atom in the crystal structure. More
Image
Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 2.7 Atomic diameters of elements. The atom size of titanium with respect to that of alloying elements More
Image
Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 3.1 Schematic of a titanium atom. The shaded area is the inner electron core; the outer electrons are the valence electrons. More
Image
Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 3.2 Atomic diameters of elements. The chart compares the atom size of titanium with other potential alloying elements. More
Image
Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 8.79 Atom force micrograph of silicon steel for electrical applications, indicating size, shape and distribution of manganese sulfide. Manganese sulfide precipitates are under 250 nm. Courtesy of M. Spangler, CETEC- MG, Brazil. More
Image
Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 7.5 Temperature dependence of the time necessary for a carbon atom to diffuse a distance of 1 mm (0.04 in.) in austenite More
Image
Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 7.6 Temperature dependence of the time necessary for a molybdenum atom to diffuse 1 mm (0.04 in.) in austenite More
Image
Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 3 Unit cells and atom positions for (a) face-centered cubic, (b) hexagonal close-packed, and (c) body-centered cubic unit cells. The positions of the atoms are shown as dots at the left of each pair of drawings, while the atoms themselves are shown close to their true effective size More
Image
Published: 01 March 2012
Fig. A.30 Frenkel mechanism. Simultaneous formation of vacancy and interstitial atom. Source: Ref A.5 as published in Ref A.1 More
Image
Published: 01 March 2012
Fig. A.32 Foreign atom point defects. Source: Ref A.5 as published in Ref A.1 More
Image
Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 4.9 Three dimensional atom maps in the cementite and ferrite of pearlite in a eutectoid steel transformed for 20 seconds at 500 °C (930 °F). Atom Probe Field Ion Micrograph. Source: Ref 4.14 More
Image
Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 16.5 Iron atom displacements due to carbon atoms in martensite. Source: Ref 16.5 More
Image
Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 17.19 (a) Carbon atom map associated with a cementite crystal (arrow) formed in martensite of 4340 steel during tempering at 325 °C (615 °F) for 2 hours, and (b) the proximity histogram showing concentrations of carbon, chromium, manganese, and molybdenum through the interface More
Image
Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 17.20 Atom maps for carbon (red) (a), chromium (blue) (b), manganese (green) (c), and molybdenum (yellow) (d) at a cementite crystal (arrow) formed in martensite of 4340 steel after tempering at 575 °C (1065 °F) for 2 hours. The proximity histogram at the bottom (e) shows concentrations More
Image
Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 2.1 Schematic diagram of the Bohr model for the oxygen atom, illustrating electron shells and valence electrons More
Image
Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 4.7 (a) Each atom in silicon shares two electrons with each of four near neighbors. (b) If an electron is removed from bonding, a conduction electron and an electron hole are created. Source: Ref 4.1 . More
Image
Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 8.7 Boron trioxide glass. Each boron atom is covalently bonded to three oxygen atoms, which form a triangle around the boron atom. Each oxygen atom is shared by two triangles. Source: Ref 8.2 More