1-20 of 422 Search Results for

arc welding

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.jub.t53290023
EISBN: 978-1-62708-306-5
... Abstract Arc welding applies to a large and diversified group of welding processes that use an electric arc as the source of heat to melt and join metals. This chapter provides a detailed overview of specific arc welding methods: shielded metal arc welding, flux cored arc welding, submerged arc...
Image
Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 6.29 Submerged arc welding. (a) Process schematic. (b) Submerged arc welding of flame-gouged seam joining the head to the shell inside a tower. Four passes were made with a current of 400 amperes and a speed of 356 mm/min (14 in. / min). Courtesy of Lincoln Electric More
Image
Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 2.14 Plasma arc welding process, showing constriction of the arc by a copper nozzle and a keyhole through the plate. Source: Ref 2.10 More
Image
Published: 01 October 2012
Fig. 2.39 Plasma arc welding process, showing constriction of the arc by a copper nozzle and a keyhole through the plate. Source: Ref 2.29 More
Image
Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 6.28 Gas tungsten arc welding. Courtesy of Lynn Welding More
Image
Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 1.6 Welding using shielded metal arc welding process More
Image
Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 6.27 Examples of components produced by gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). (a) Thin walled aluminum. (b) Titanium components. Courtesy of Lynn Welding More
Image
Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 6.30 Submerged arc welding of a wear-resistant overlay. Courtesy of Lincoln Electric More
Image
Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 2.2 Setup and fundamentals of operation for shielded metal arc welding. Source: 2.3 More
Image
Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 2.4 Gas shielded flux cored arc welding. Source: Ref 2.3 More
Image
Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 2.5 Semiautomatic flux cored arc welding equipment. Source: Ref 2.3 More
Image
Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 2.6 Typical submerged arc welding equipment layout. CTWD, contact tip to work distance. Source: Ref 2.3 (bottom), Ref 2.5 (top) More
Image
Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 2.8 Schematic of gas metal arc welding process. Source: Ref 2.6 More
Image
Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 2.9 Modes of metal transfer in gas metal arc welding: (a) spray transfer; (b) globular transfer; and (c), (d), (e), and (f) steps in short-circuiting transfer. Source: Ref 2.3 More
Image
Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 2.10 Typical semiautomatic gas-cooled, curved-neck gas metal arc welding gun. Source: Ref 2.6 More
Image
Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 2.11 Key components of the gas tungsten arc welding process. Source: Ref 2.7 More
Image
Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 2.12 Effect of polarity on gas tungsten arc welding weld configuration when using direct current: (a) direct current electrode negative (DCEN), deep penetration, narrow melted area, approximate 30% heat in electrode and 70% heat in base metal; (b) direct current electrode positive (DCEP More
Image
Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 2.15 Plasma–gas tungsten arc welding equipment. Source: Ref 2.3 More
Image
Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 4.3 Typical integrated power/control system for stud arc welding. Source: Ref 4.3 More
Image
Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 4.4 Stud arc welding process: (a) gun is properly positioned; (b) trigger is depressed and stud is lifted, creating an arc; (c) arcing period is completed and stud is plunged into molten pool of metal on base material; (d) gun is withdrawn from welded stud and ferrule is removed. Source More