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Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.jub.t53290023
EISBN: 978-1-62708-306-5
... Abstract Arc welding applies to a large and diversified group of welding processes that use an electric arc as the source of heat to melt and join metals. This chapter provides a detailed overview of specific arc welding methods: shielded metal arc welding, flux cored arc welding, submerged arc...
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 6.29 Submerged arc welding. (a) Process schematic. (b) Submerged arc welding of flame-gouged seam joining the head to the shell inside a tower. Four passes were made with a current of 400 amperes and a speed of 356 mm/min (14 in. / min). Courtesy of Lincoln Electric More
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Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 2.14 Plasma arc welding process, showing constriction of the arc by a copper nozzle and a keyhole through the plate. Source: Ref 2.10 More
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Published: 01 October 2012
Fig. 2.39 Plasma arc welding process, showing constriction of the arc by a copper nozzle and a keyhole through the plate. Source: Ref 2.29 More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 6.28 Gas tungsten arc welding. Courtesy of Lynn Welding More
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Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 1.6 Welding using shielded metal arc welding process More
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Published: 30 June 2023
Fig. 10.27 Two most popular fusion melting processes. (a) Gas metal arc welding (GMAW) and (b) gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 14.2 Gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 9.14 Joint designs and dimensions for arc welding of nickel-base and iron-nickel-base superalloys Base-metal thickness ( t ), in. (mm) Width of groove or bead ( w ), in. (mm) Maximum root opening ( s ), in. (mm) Approximate amount of metal deposited, lb/ft (kg/m) Approximate More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 6.27 Examples of components produced by gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). (a) Thin walled aluminum. (b) Titanium components. Courtesy of Lynn Welding More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 6.30 Submerged arc welding of a wear-resistant overlay. Courtesy of Lincoln Electric More
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Published: 01 December 2000
Fig. 9.9 Setup for inert gas shielding for gas-tungsten arc welding of titanium alloys outside a welding chamber. Gas shielding is from the torch and through ports in hold-down bars, backing bars, and from trailing and backup shields. More
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Published: 01 July 2009
Fig. 23.11 Double-U-groove joint commonly used in gas metal arc welding of beryllium plate and tube. Source: Weiss 1983 More
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Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 2.2 Setup and fundamentals of operation for shielded metal arc welding. Source: 2.3 More
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Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 2.4 Gas shielded flux cored arc welding. Source: Ref 2.3 More
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Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 2.5 Semiautomatic flux cored arc welding equipment. Source: Ref 2.3 More
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Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 2.6 Typical submerged arc welding equipment layout. CTWD, contact tip to work distance. Source: Ref 2.3 (bottom), Ref 2.5 (top) More
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Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 2.8 Schematic of gas metal arc welding process. Source: Ref 2.6 More
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Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 2.9 Modes of metal transfer in gas metal arc welding: (a) spray transfer; (b) globular transfer; and (c), (d), (e), and (f) steps in short-circuiting transfer. Source: Ref 2.3 More
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Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 2.10 Typical semiautomatic gas-cooled, curved-neck gas metal arc welding gun. Source: Ref 2.6 More