1-20 of 164 Search Results for

anodic polarization curve

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Image
Published: 01 July 2000
Fig. 5.41 Approximate anodic polarization curve for iron and cathodic polarization curves for oxygen under several conditions and for nitrite ions. The polarization curves are used to estimate the effects of these environments on corrosion rate. Estimated Ecorr and icorr for the several More
Image
Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 2 Schematic anodic polarization curve. Metal-environment systems that have this type of anodic polarization behavior are termed active-passive and can be anodically protected. Source: Ref 23 More
Image
Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 5 Anodic-polarization curve for aluminum alloy 1100. Specimens were immersed in neutral deaerated NaCl solution free of cathodic reactant. Pitting develops only at potentials more cathodic than the pitting potential E p . The intersection of the anodic curve for aluminum (solid line More
Image
Published: 01 July 2000
Fig. 3.3 Anodic polarization curve representative of active/passive alloys. Oxide films forming in the potential range a to c cause a decrease in current density. More
Image
Published: 01 July 2000
Fig. 5.23 Potentiostatic anodic polarization curve for copper in deaerated 1 N H 2 SO 4 at 25 °C. Redrawn from Ref 20 More
Image
Published: 01 July 2000
Fig. 7.12 Schematic anodic polarization curve for a metal having susceptibility to pitting. Pitting is initiated at the breakdown potential E b,pit . More
Image
Published: 01 July 2000
Fig. 7.13 Anodic polarization curve showing current bursts at potentials below the breakdown potential. Type 304 stainless steel in 200 ppm chloride ion solution at room temperature, pH = 4 More
Image
Published: 01 July 2000
Fig. 7.41 Anodic polarization curve for 99.99 wt% aluminum in deaerated 0.1 M NaCl solution. E b,pit is potential at which upscan of the potential, starting at the corrosion potential, results in sudden increase in current density. Redrawn from Ref 61 More
Image
Published: 01 December 1984
Figure 3-6 Potentiostatic anodic polarization curve for tin and zinc in 1 N NaOH at 25°C. (From Greene et al., Ref. 21, courtesy of Pergamon Press.) More
Image
Published: 01 July 2000
Fig. 5.6 Anodic polarization curves for iron dissolution (solid curves) and for total current density of iron plus oxygen evolution (dashed curves) after 1 h at steady state in deaerated 0.15 M Na 3 PO 4 solution. Indicated pH obtained by use of acid and base buffers and additions of H 2 SO 4 More
Image
Published: 01 July 2000
Fig. 4.13 Relationship of the mixed-electrode cathodic and anodic polarization curves (solid lines) to the oxidation and reduction components (dashed lines) of the individual anodic and cathodic reactions More
Image
Published: 01 July 2000
Fig. 4.15 Mixed-electrode cathodic and anodic polarization curves (solid lines) based on the reduction component of the cathodic reaction and the oxidation component of the anodic reaction (compare with Fig. 4.13 ) More
Image
Published: 01 July 2000
Fig. 4.28 Idealized anodic polarization curves for metals A and B and for hydrogen and oxygen reduction. An explanation for the use of these curves for estimating the corrosion potentials, currents and rates for aerated and deaerated environments and for galvanic coupling can be found More
Image
Published: 01 July 2000
Fig. 5.1 Schematic representation of several forms of anodic polarization curves and associated potential decay curves following release of potentiostatic control More
Image
Published: 01 July 2000
Fig. 5.20 Representative anodic polarization curves for indicated pure metals in 1 N H 2 SO 4 , pH = 0.56. Linear sections at lower potentials are representative of Tafel behavior. Redrawn from Ref 5 , 10 – 14 More
Image
Published: 01 July 2000
Fig. 5.21 Anodic polarization curves determined potentiostatically for three low index faces cut from a nickel monocrystal grown parallel to (110), 1 N H 2 SO 4 at 22–23 °C. Redrawn from Ref 15 More
Image
Published: 01 July 2000
Fig. 5.24 Anodic polarization curves for iron-chromium alloys in 1 N H 2 SO 4 . Redrawn from Ref 21 More
Image
Published: 01 July 2000
Fig. 5.27 Anodic polarization curves for nickel-chromium alloys in 1 N H 2 SO 4 . Redrawn from Ref 13 More
Image
Published: 01 July 2000
Fig. 5.28 Anodic polarization curves for chromium-nickel alloys in 1 N H 2 SO 4 . Redrawn from Ref 13 More
Image
Published: 01 July 2000
Fig. 5.29 Anodic polarization curves for nickel-molybdenum alloys in 1 N H 2 SO 4 . Redrawn from Ref 26 More