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aluminum nitride embrittlement

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Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.spsp2.t54410439
EISBN: 978-1-62708-265-5
... forging, and may contribute to overheating as indicated in Fig. 19.8 . Aluminum Nitride Embrittlement Aluminum nitride embrittlement is another low-toughness phenomenon associated with primary processing, most often with carbon steel castings ( Ref 19.29 – 19.31 ). This type of embrittlement...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.mfub.t53740271
EISBN: 978-1-62708-308-9
... and discusses the effect of precipitation hardening on aluminum and other alloys. continuous cooling transformation diagrams hardenability heat treatment temper embrittlement ONE OF THE PRIMARY advantages of steels is their ability to attain high strengths through heat treatment while still...
Image
Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 8.81 “Rock candy” fracture surface in cast steel, embrittled by the precipitation of aluminum nitride on the grain boundaries during solidification. Source: Ref 31 , 39 More
Image
Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 8.82 “Rock candy” fracture surface in cast steel, embrittled by the precipitation of aluminum nitride on the grain boundaries during solidification. SEM, SE. Source: Ref 31 , 39 More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 April 2024
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.phtpp.t59380191
EISBN: 978-1-62708-456-7
... of grain size. During solidification, aluminum combines with nitrogen to form aluminum nitrides (Al-N) that pin grain boundaries and limit grain growth of austenite. When added to steel in specified amounts, it controls austenite grain growth in reheated steels. Aluminum-killed steels reduce grain growth...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.pnfn.t65900125
EISBN: 978-1-62708-350-8
... nitriding steel selection MANY STEELS are commercially nitrided: Aluminum-containing low-alloy steels, including the Nitralloy group with 1% Al Medium-carbon, chromium-containing low-alloy steels of the 4100, 4300, 5100, 6100, 8600, 8700, and 9800 series Hot-work die steels containing 5...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.aub.t61170123
EISBN: 978-1-62708-297-6
.... Aluminum is also an important alloying element in nitrided steels. Aluminum is beneficial in nitriding because it forms a nitride (AIN) that is stable at nitriding temperatures. Because aluminum is the strongest nitride-former of the common alloying elements, aluminum-containing steels (typically about 1.4...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 April 2024
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.phtpp.t59380235
EISBN: 978-1-62708-456-7
..., usually after rapid cooling or cold working. See aging. age softening Spontaneous decrease of strength and hardness that takes place at room temperature in certain strain hardened alloys, especially those of aluminum. aging A change in the properties of certain metals and alloys that occurs at ambient...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 April 2024
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.phtpp.9781627084567
EISBN: 978-1-62708-456-7
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ssde.t52310001
EISBN: 978-1-62708-286-0
.... Introduction Most widely used alloy systems, such as carbon steels, alloy steels, and aluminum alloys, are relatively dilute solutions of several elements in the parent matrix. Carbon and alloy steels, with very few exceptions, are principally of the magnetic body-centered cubic (bcc) phase or a slightly...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ssde.t52310109
EISBN: 978-1-62708-286-0
... for stainless steel. It was made possible by the very low carbon plus nitrogen levels the AOD process provided and the use of stabilization. Thus, 409 was an improvement on 405 in which aluminum performed a quasi stabilization, and low carbon suppressed martensite. A similar predecessor was 410S, a low-carbon...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cpi2.t55030176
EISBN: 978-1-62708-282-2
.... In oxidizing, sulfidizing, and carburizing gases, high chromium contents, such as in type 310 (25% Cr, S31000) or its cast variant HK (J94224), improve resistance to attack. In addition, alloying with aluminum and silicon can be beneficial to oxidation resistance, as in type 406 (3.5% Al) and in type 302B...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 September 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.fahtsc.t51130311
EISBN: 978-1-62708-284-6
... major applications: hot forging, especially for steel forgings; extrusion; and die casting ( Fig. 2 ). The two last groups are mainly employed for aluminum alloys and for producing construction or automotive parts, respectively. All applications normally employ AISI grades H steel as core tools. However...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2000
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.htgpge.t67320133
EISBN: 978-1-62708-347-8
... in the steel selected to form hard nitrides of such elements. Of these, aluminum nitrides offer the highest surface hardness, whereas chromium, vanadium, and molybdenum nitrides result in a deeper and tougher case. Because nitriding takes place at a temperature well below the critical temperature of steel...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2000
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ttg2.t61120123
EISBN: 978-1-62708-269-3
... titanium to dissimilar metals usually does not accelerate corrosion of the titanium except in reducing environments, where titanium does not become passivated. Under reducing conditions, it has a galvanic potential similar to that of aluminum and undergoes accelerated corrosion when coupled to more noble...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2007
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.htcma.t52080067
EISBN: 978-1-62708-304-1
... reaction. However, nitridation can take place for some alloys when oxide scales no longer provide protection. The alloys that are particularly susceptible to oxidation/nitridation attack are those containing strong nitride formers, such as titanium and aluminum. Many high-temperature nickel-base alloys...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.pnfn.t65900013
EISBN: 978-1-62708-350-8
... (by gas nitriding). In the early days of process development, Fry developed the Nitralloy group of special alloy steels that produce high hardness values after nitriding. The Nitralloy steels contain alloying elements such as chromium, molybdenum, vanadium, tungsten, and aluminum. Because these steels...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.aub.t61170337
EISBN: 978-1-62708-297-6
.... The embrittlement involves the reaction of water vapor in air with reactive elements (aluminum, for example) in intermetallics to form atomic hydrogen, which drives into the metal and causes premature fracture. Thus, the poor fracture resistance and limited fabricability have restricted the use of aluminides...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.spsp2.t54410499
EISBN: 978-1-62708-265-5
... (a) 0.027 0.02 (a) 0.02 0.02 0.02 (a) Chromium 0.51 0.47 0.48 0.52 0.64 NA (b) NA (b) 0.53 0.49 Molybdenum 0.26 0.21 0.34 0.26 0.31 0.27 0.27 0.52 0.74 Nickel NA (b) 0.53 0.54 1.76 1.56 3.56 3.48 0.80 1.84 Aluminum 0.08 (a) 0.08 (a) 0.08 (a) 0.08...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 1983
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.mlt.t62860343
EISBN: 978-1-62708-348-5
.... On the basis of Glassman’s criteria, titanium, iron, steels, nickel, zirconium, and hafnium are predicted to burn on the surface, and magnesium, calcium, strontium, barium, and aluminum are predicted to burn in the vapor phase. The presence of metal oxides in the combustion zone has a strong influence...