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alumina

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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 8.72 Alumina inclusion from a steel ingot produced via electroslag remelting. The polygonal shape indicates that the inclusion has formed as a solid phase. These inclusions are frequently classified as type D according to ASTM E45 methods. SEM, SE. The steel was completely dissolved via More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 11.30 Longitudinal cross section of a plate presenting a long alumina inclusion, broken and redistributed during the hot working. The inclusion is around 30 μm below the plate surface. Not etched. More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 11.31 Longitudinal cross section of a plate presenting a long alumina inclusion, broken and redistributed during the hot working. Not etched. More
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Published: 30 April 2020
Fig. 9.4 Weibull plot for the fracture strength of die-compacted alumina containing a mixture of polyvinyl alcohol and polyethylene glycol. The plot shows the log of the measured strength versus the double logarithm of the failure probability function, where the slope gives a Weibull modulus More
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Published: 30 April 2020
Fig. 10.31 Translucent dental brackets fabricated from alumina by using injection molding More
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Published: 30 April 2020
Fig. 10.32 Grain size versus density for 0.45 μm alumina sintered at 1620 °C (2950 °F). The lower-melting-temperature iron oxide segregates to grain boundaries and increases grain growth, while the high-melting-temperature magnesium oxide segregates to grain boundaries to retard grain growth More
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Published: 30 April 2020
Fig. 10.33 High-purity alumina is sintered with different dopants at increasing concentrations to show that densification improves with magnesia but is hindered with calcia. Source: Bae and Baik ( Ref 19 ) More
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Published: 30 April 2020
Fig. 10.35 Solvent immersion debinding data for 0.8 μm alumina. Trials over several hours are reported for three temperatures, showing more rapid filler-phase removal as temperature increases. Source: Oliveira et al. ( Ref 22 ) More
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Published: 30 April 2020
Fig. 10.40 Data collected for grain size and density for alumina sintered over a range of times and temperatures, illustrating rapid grain growth as porosity is eliminated. Source: Suzuki et al. ( Ref 23 , 24 , 25 ) More
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Published: 30 April 2020
Fig 10.42 Typical injection-molded and sintered alumina component with a characteristic cream color corresponding to approximately 99% density More
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Published: 30 April 2020
Fig. 10.43 Extruded alumina rod sintered to a high level of optical transparency More
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Published: 30 April 2020
Fig. 10.44 Outdoor lightbulb with an injection-molded translucent alumina vapor chamber that contains metal vapors at 1200 °C (2190 °F) to generate high-intensity lighting More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 5.35 Optical micrographs showing the microstructures of (a) alumina-former alloy 214 (Ni-16Cr-3Fe-4.5Al-Y), and several chromia-former alloys (b) 601 (Ni-23Cr-14Fe-1.4Al), (c) X (Ni-22Cr-18Fe-9Mo), and (d) 150 (Co-27Cr-18Fe) after testing at 980 °C (1800 °F) for 55 h in Ar-5%H 2 -5%CO-5 More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 6.39 Corrosion behavior of alumina former alloy 214 and intermetallics Fe 3 Al and TiAl; tested for 300 h at temperatures from 300 to 800 °C (572 to 1472 °F) in air-2Cl 2 ; (a) decrease in thicknesses as a function of temperature, and (b) depth of internal corrosion attack as a function More
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Published: 30 April 2020
Fig. 3.10 Feedstock viscosity at room temperature for an alumina (Al 2 O 3 ) tape casting formulation, demonstrating viscosity reduction with the addition of a phosphate ester. Source: Moreno ( Ref 1 ) More
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Published: 30 April 2020
Fig. 5.21 Submicrometer alumina powder with a wax-polymer binder tested by using the melt flow index at three different temperatures. The system shows no flow at 54 vol% solids loading. Source: Wei et al. ( Ref 3 ) More
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Published: 30 April 2020
Fig. 6.5 Example of alumina compaction data showing the pressed density as a percentage of theoretical for 0.4 μm powder agglomerated with 5 wt% polyvinyl glycol. At high pressures, the compact becomes more resistant to densification. Source: Verma et al. ( Ref 1 ) More
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Published: 30 April 2020
Fig. 7.14 Photograph of blisters on an alumina component after partial binder removal. These blisters formed because molten binder migrated into previously open pores to hinder vapor release during heating. More
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Published: 30 April 2020
Fig. 7.22 Data on strength evolution during heating for alumina powder injection molded with three binders, showing the backbone polymers. Although the changes are significantly different, by the end of the burnout cycle the residual strength is fairly similar, independent of the binder. More
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Published: 30 April 2020
Fig. 8.18 Strength for sintered 4 μm alumina, showing the variation after reaching different hold temperatures More