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alumina

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Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 33.7 Saffil alumina fiber preform More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 8.72 Alumina inclusion from a steel ingot produced via electroslag remelting. The polygonal shape indicates that the inclusion has formed as a solid phase. These inclusions are frequently classified as type D according to ASTM E45 methods. SEM, SE. The steel was completely dissolved via More
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Published: 30 April 2020
Fig. 9.4 Weibull plot for the fracture strength of die-compacted alumina containing a mixture of polyvinyl alcohol and polyethylene glycol. The plot shows the log of the measured strength versus the double logarithm of the failure probability function, where the slope gives a Weibull modulus More
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Published: 30 April 2020
Fig. 10.31 Translucent dental brackets fabricated from alumina by using injection molding More
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Published: 30 April 2020
Fig. 10.32 Grain size versus density for 0.45 μm alumina sintered at 1620 °C (2950 °F). The lower-melting-temperature iron oxide segregates to grain boundaries and increases grain growth, while the high-melting-temperature magnesium oxide segregates to grain boundaries to retard grain growth More
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Published: 30 April 2020
Fig. 10.33 High-purity alumina is sintered with different dopants at increasing concentrations to show that densification improves with magnesia but is hindered with calcia. Source: Bae and Baik ( Ref 19 ) More
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Published: 30 April 2020
Fig. 10.35 Solvent immersion debinding data for 0.8 μm alumina. Trials over several hours are reported for three temperatures, showing more rapid filler-phase removal as temperature increases. Source: Oliveira et al. ( Ref 22 ) More
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Published: 30 April 2020
Fig. 10.40 Data collected for grain size and density for alumina sintered over a range of times and temperatures, illustrating rapid grain growth as porosity is eliminated. Source: Suzuki et al. ( Ref 23 , 24 , 25 ) More
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Published: 30 April 2020
Fig 10.42 Typical injection-molded and sintered alumina component with a characteristic cream color corresponding to approximately 99% density More
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Published: 30 April 2020
Fig. 10.43 Extruded alumina rod sintered to a high level of optical transparency More
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Published: 30 April 2020
Fig. 10.44 Outdoor lightbulb with an injection-molded translucent alumina vapor chamber that contains metal vapors at 1200 °C (2190 °F) to generate high-intensity lighting More
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Published: 01 December 1999
Fig. 5.44 Rotating bending fatigue of samples initiated by B (alumina, irregular), D (calcium aluminate, spherical), and T (titanium carbonitride, cuboid) type inclusions in an SAE 52100 steel. Source: Ref 65 More
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Published: 30 April 2021
Fig. 8.7 Three-body abrasion characteristics (after ASTM G65 with 60 mesh alumina) of two carbon steels compared with an alloy steel (4340). All were tested in the annealed condition. More
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Published: 30 April 2021
Fig. 8.9 ASTM G132 type of two-body abrasion test (alumina sandpaper) results on the hardest alloy steel (52100 at 60 HRC); a typical cold-worked tool steel, D2 at 60 HRC; and a 1020 steel reference at 95 HRB. More
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Published: 30 April 2021
Fig. 10.6 Erosion of alumina and 304 stainless steel (SS) in a 90° impingement solid-particle erosion test (in accordance with ASTM International G76) More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 20.11 Saffil alumina fiber preform More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 11.30 Longitudinal cross section of a plate presenting a long alumina inclusion, broken and redistributed during the hot working. The inclusion is around 30 μm below the plate surface. Not etched. More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 11.31 Longitudinal cross section of a plate presenting a long alumina inclusion, broken and redistributed during the hot working. Not etched. More
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Published: 01 December 1984
Figure 5-21 Example of typical Palmqvist identation fracture data for alumina-titanium carbide cermets. The inverse of the slope is the Palmqvist fracture toughness in kilograms per millimeter. More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 5.35 Optical micrographs showing the microstructures of (a) alumina-former alloy 214 (Ni-16Cr-3Fe-4.5Al-Y), and several chromia-former alloys (b) 601 (Ni-23Cr-14Fe-1.4Al), (c) X (Ni-22Cr-18Fe-9Mo), and (d) 150 (Co-27Cr-18Fe) after testing at 980 °C (1800 °F) for 55 h in Ar-5%H 2 -5%CO-5 More