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alloy steel

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Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cw.t51820013
EISBN: 978-1-62708-339-3
... Abstract Carbon and low-alloy steels are the most frequently welded metallic materials, and much of the welding metallurgy research has focused on this class of materials. Key metallurgical factors of interest include an understanding of the solidification of welds, microstructure of the weld...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.isceg.t59320217
EISBN: 978-1-62708-332-4
... Abstract Steel is broadly classified as plain-carbon steels, low-alloy steels, and high-alloy steels. This chapter begins by describing microconstituents of low- and medium-carbon steel, including bainite and martensite. This is followed by a section discussing the effect of alloying elements...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 July 1997
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.wip.t65930217
EISBN: 978-1-62708-359-1
.... The service properties of weldments in corrosive environments are considered and subjected to cyclic loading. The article summarizes the effects of major alloying elements in carbon and low-alloy steels on HAZ microstructure and toughness. It discusses the processes involved in controlling toughness...
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Published: 01 January 2022
Fig. 12.66 Feeding distance for a high-alloy steel CF-8M compared with AISI 1025 steel; D R , diameter of the riser or feeder; FD, feeding distance. Source: Ref 27 More
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 3-5 Grooved roll for steel mill of Cr-Mo alloy steel, 120 in. (3048 mm) roll face, 45 in. (1143 mm diameter, 74,940 lb (33,985 kg). Back-up roll suspended from overhead crane weighs 95,000 lb (43,082 kg). More
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Published: 01 December 2018
Fig. 6.110 Oil-ash corrosion in low-alloy steel tube: (a) scale formation, (b) wall thinning More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 8.17 Water-quenched low-alloy steel showing clearly delineated prior austenite grain boundaries. Matrix is lath martensite. Marshall’s reagent. 200× More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 10.11 Cooling transformation diagram for an alloy steel with 0.40% C, 1.50% Ni, 1.20% Cr, and 0.30% Mo, plotted as a function of bar diameter. Steel was austenitized at 850 °C (1562 °F); previous treatment: rolling, then softening at 650 °C (1202 °F). Source: Ref 10.9 More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 9 Fatigue striations in low-carbon alloy steel (8620). This scanning electron microscope fractograph shows the roughly horizontal ridges, which are the advance of the crack front with each load application. The crack progresses in the direction of the arrow. Original magnification at 2000× More
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Published: 01 May 2018
FIG. 5.2 The Pope bicycle used 5% nickel alloy steel for the frame. More
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Published: 01 May 2018
FIG. 5.3 The Haynes-Apperson Company used 5% nickel alloy steel for the first time in an automobile. Source: Brian Snelson. More
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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 27 Reversed bending fatigue of an alloy-steel steering knuckle at a hardness level of 30 HRC with nonuniform application of stresses. The multiple-origin fatigue at the bottom was caused by the tendency of normal wheel loading to bend the spindle (lower right) of the knuckle upward More
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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 3 A subsurface-origin pit in a carburized and hardened alloy steel test roller caused by fatigue in the manner shown in Fig. 2 . When this specimen was tested in essentially pure rolling, a steep-sided, irregularly shaped pit was formed, and the test was stopped. The extremely high force More
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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 2 Creep curves for a molybdenum-vanadium low-alloy steel under tension at four stress levels at 600 °C (1112 °F). Source: Ref 2 More
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Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. 22 Hardenability band for an alloy steel. 4150H: 0.47 to 0.54% C, 0.65 to 1.10% Mn. Normalized at 870 °C (1600 °F). Annealed at 845 °C (1550 °F). Source: Ref 9 More
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Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. 2 Effect of boron on hardenability of 5160H alloy steel. Source: Ref 3 More
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Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 28 Effect of cathodic protection on the fatigue performance of alloy steel in seawater. Tests performed on 6.4 mm (1/4 in.) diam specimens at a mean stress of 425 MPa (69 ksi) More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 9.15 Martensite in low alloy steel ASTM A533 Cl.1 (ASME SA 533 Cl 1 or 20MnMoNi55) with C = 0.2%, Mn = 1.38%, Si = 0.25%, Ni = 0.83%, Mo = 0.49% continuously cooled at 50 °C/s (90 °F/s). Transformation start temperature: 415 °C (780 °F). Etchant: Nital 2%. Courtesy of B. Marini, CEA More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 9.27 Bainite in low alloy steel ASTM A 533 Cl.1 (ASME SA 533 Cl 1 or 20MnMoNi55) containing C = 0.2%, Mn = 1.38%, Si = 0.25%, Ni = 0.83%, Mo = 0.49% (same steel as in Fig. 9.15 ) continuously cooled at 0.1 °C/s (0.18 °F/s). Transformation start at 590 °C (1094 °F). Etchant: nital 2 More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 9.28 Bainite in low alloy steel ASTM A 533 Cl.1 (ASME SA 533 Cl 1 or 20MnMoNi55) containing C = 0.2%, Mn = 1.38%, Si = 0.25%, Ni = 0.83%, Mo = 0.49% (same steel as in Fig. 9.15 ) continuously cooled at 2 °C/s (3.5 °F/s). Transformation start at 590 °C (1094 °F). Etchant: nital 2%. Prior More