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alloy components

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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 3.9 Tube-to-plate joint in aluminum engineering alloy components, torch brazed in air using a low-melting-point aluminum-base filler metal and commercially available flux More
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Published: 01 October 2012
Fig. 1.12 Titanium alloy investment castings. (a) Investment-cast titanium components for use in corrosive environments. (b) Titanium knee and hip implant prostheses manufactured by the investment casting process. Source: Ref 1.6 More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 3.22 Forged aluminum alloy 2014-T6 aircraft component that failed by fatigue. Characteristic beach marks are evident. See also Fig. 3.23 More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 3.14 Semisolid formed alloy A357.0 landing gear component More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 3.4 A component made of an aluminum engineering alloy (type 6082), fabricated by fluxless brazing in a nitrogen flow furnace. The brazed joints exist at the interface between the web members and the face plates and also at the intersection of each web member. A similar component is shown More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 1.9 Superplastic forming and diffusion bonding of titanium. (a) Schematic of the steps involved. (b) Typical three-sheet titanium alloy component formed superplastically and diffusion bonded. (c) Cross section through a diffusion-bonded joint in titanium alloy, made at 980 °C (1795 °F More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2016
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ascaam.t59190vii
EISBN: 978-1-62708-296-9
... ). The additional components usually have very low solubility in the αAl solid solution at liquidus and at room temperature ( Table 4 ); therefore, most of them are included in the intermetallic phase particles ( Table 5 ), changing alloy microstructure permanently ( Table 6 ). Therefore, this new phase constituent...
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Published: 01 December 2006
Fig. 4.11 Tertiary system representation. (a) Isothermal section (temperature T 1 = constant). (b) Quasi-binary section (alloy component B, e.g., 40%) [ Ber 83 ] More
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 March 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.stg2.t61280135
EISBN: 978-1-62708-267-9
... precipitation-hardened iron-nickel- and nickel-base superalloys) are: Applying a thermal shock test to an airfoil Heating an alloy during pack coating Welding an alloy Brazing an alloy Reheating an alloy for rewelding for the second or third time Reheating a brazed component to rebraze...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2000
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ttg2.t61120131
EISBN: 978-1-62708-269-3
... casting, ingot metallurgy, and powder metallurgy. Precision investment castings have been made from an alpha-2 base alloy, and a ring for a combustor liner was rolled successfully from it. In one instance, a rolled ring of this type of alloy was made into a compressor case component and successfully...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2016
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ascaam.t59190001
EISBN: 978-1-62708-296-9
... in liquid (heat transfer through liquid, Fig. 1.5b ) ( Ref 4 , 6 – 8 ). However, total undercooling Δ T in front of the S-L interface in the metal alloys can consist of as many as four components: thermal Δ T T , constitutional Δ T C , curvature Δ T R , and kinetic (interfacial) Δ T κ...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2016
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.hpcspa.t54460277
EISBN: 978-1-62708-285-3
... in the Defense Industry,” in this book. One of the successful applications for cold spray is in repair of magnesium alloy parts ( Ref 11.1 – 11.3 ) for U.S. Army and Navy aircraft components, such as fan blades, landing gears, transmission and gear box housing for rotorcraft, and advanced fixed-wing...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.pb.t51230047
EISBN: 978-1-62708-351-5
... with Complete Solubility in the Solid State, Used to Join Components of One of the Constituent Metals with No New Phase Formation Example 5: Complete Intersolubility between a Eutectic Braze and the Metal on the Joint Surfaces 2.3.2 Examples Drawn from Ternary Alloy Systems Example 3: A Binary Eutectic...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 March 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.stg2.t61280091
EISBN: 978-1-62708-267-9
... have an important effect on the final properties of a given alloy component. Cold deformation of large shapes is not normally feasible with superalloys, although sheet may be cold rolled to impart favorable properties. Forging is one wrought process, but there are others. Not all forging processes...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 1999
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.caaa.t67870161
EISBN: 978-1-62708-299-0
.... In some cases, an alloy constituent can be formed by alloying components of the base and filler alloys to produce an anodic zone at the transition of the weld and base metal. If a 5 xxx alloy is welded with an aluminum-silicon filler, or vice versa, then a magnesium silicide constituent can be formed...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2000
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ttg2.t61120047
EISBN: 978-1-62708-269-3
... high-performance application areas, such as aerospace and sporting goods (e.g., golf club heads and racing bicycles) applications, biomedical implants, and other industrial and marine corrosion service, will pay for the higher price of titanium alloy components. However, the initial cost of titanium...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ex2.t69980009
EISBN: 978-1-62708-342-3
.... The Young’s modulus ( E ) is approximately 45 GPa and, therefore, about 65% of the E -modulus of aluminum alloys. For this reason, they are, in principle, more interesting than aluminum alloys as a construction material for light components. However, the corrosion resistance of magnesium components...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cw.t51820169
EISBN: 978-1-62708-339-3
... to join the aluminum side of the transition piece to the intended component. The dissimilar metal is joined to the opposite side of the bimetallic transition. An example of a transition material insert to join aluminum to steel can be found in Fig. 4 in Chapter 8, “Corrosion of Nonferrous Alloy Weldments...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 March 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.stg2.t61280323
EISBN: 978-1-62708-267-9
... Abstract This chapter discusses the failure of superalloy components in high-temperature applications where they are subject to the effects of microstructural changes, melting, and corrosion. It explains how overheating can deplete alloying elements and alter the composition and distribution...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.pb.t51230143
EISBN: 978-1-62708-351-5
... designed to minimize dynamic thermal expansion mismatch between brazed components of different thermal attributes Fig. 4.23 (a) Test piece used to determine the propensity for void formation as a function of joint dimensions. In this case, the components are an aluminum engineering alloy (AlMn1...